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Title: Letter from John Henderson to his mother, Mary Ferrand Henderson, September 22, 1862 (In Which He Gives Various Reasons Why He Should Join the Army): Electronic Edition.
Author: Henderson, John, fl. 1863
Funding from the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supported the electronic publication of this title.
Text transcribed by Bari Helms
Images scanned by Caitlin R. Donnelly
Text encoded by Caitlin R. Donnelly
First Edition, 2007
Size of electronic edition: ca. 12K
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2007
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text
The electronic edition is a part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2007-05-25, Caitlin R. Donnelly finished TEI/XML encoding.
Source(s):
Title of collection: John Steele Henderson Papers (#327), Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Title of document: Letter from John Henderson to his mother, Mary Ferrand Henderson, September 22, 1862 (In Which He Gives Various Reasons Why He Should Join the Army)
Author: John
Description: 4 pages, 4 page images
Note: Call number 327 (Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Editorial practices
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Originals are in the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Original grammar, punctuation, and spelling have been preserved.
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For more information about transcription and other editorial decisions, see the section Editorial Practices.
Letter from John Henderson to his mother, Mary Ferrand Henderson, September 22, 1862 (In Which He Gives Various Reasons Why He Should Join the Army)
Henderson, John, fl. 1863



Page [1]
Chapel Hill N. C. Sept 22nd 1862

My Dear Mother

We have gained another great victory, this time on the sacred soil of Maryland, but the rumor that general Branch has been slain throws a gloom over the southern community; God grant that the rumor is unfounded. No details have come to hand but I do not doubt, but that the Yankees have met with another crushing defeat. My mind still wanders with our armies in the field and I cannot oh I cannot think it is my duty to remain here, while such important events are occurring. It is true I am not of military age, but there are twenty thousand in the army, who are not eighteen, and they fight none the less hard for it. Ever since this war broke out, it has been my desire (as you my parents know) to buckle on my armor and go

Page [2]
to meet the invader. If I do not go to the war and the war should be finished before I attain military age, my chance for preferment in this world is gone forever, in vain shall I then plead younth as my excuse; the answer will be there were twenty thousand of your age in the army who unlike yourself went and met the enemy. Besides my going to the war will do no harm to the country; I dont assist in any way in furnishing food for the army in the field; I consume, I do not help to make. Besides do you not think sometimes, that I must picture to myself the future, when perhaps I may have a family of children, and when they shall sit on my knees and look up and say Father "O tell us all about the war, and what they killed each other for." The war may last long enough for me to get into it but then again, it may end tomorrow,

Page [3]
who can tell what a day or an hour may bring forth. If the enemy meet with such crushing defeats as they have within the last few months they must without doubt make peace; the northern people must come to their senses and when they do woe to all engaged in Lincolns vile usurpation. In a little more than a year I will be eighteen and I do not believe that I will much stronger than I am now. I am very sorry to hear, that my little sister has had an attack of fever and hope that she will soon recover. I think, with you, that Len's box was worth an answer; he must have had a rare time amongst his fellow officers; for the box of provisions would have gone a long way. It was indeed, as you say, "huge." How do you suppose before Len will get into active service. I doubt very much, whether the Yankees will let Colonel Shaw pass through the lines. They

Page [4]
are certainly a perfidious race. As I have to study mathematics (I hope you will excuse all mistakes) I must now close.

Your aff son

John