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Title: Letter from John Henderson to his Mother, February 14, 1863: Electronic Edition.
Author: Henderson, John, fl. 1863
Funding from the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supported the electronic publication of this title.
Text transcribed by Bari Helms
Images scanned by Bari Helms
Text encoded by Amanda Page
First Edition, 2005
Size of electronic edition: ca. 8K
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2005
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text
The electronic edition is a part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2005-06-15, Amanda Page finished TEI/XML encoding.
Source(s):
Title of collection: John Steele Henderson Papers (#327), Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Title of document: Letter from John Henderson to his Mother, February 14, 1863
Author: John
Description: 3 pages, 3 page images
Note: Call number 327 (Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Editorial practices
The text has been encoded using the recommendations for Level 5 of the TEI in Libraries Guidelines.
Originals are in the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Original grammar, punctuation, and spelling have been preserved.
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Letters, words and passages marked as deleted or added in originals have been encoded accordingly.
All quotation marks, em dashes and ampersand have been transcribed as entity references.
All double right and left quotation marks are encoded as ".
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For more information about transcription and other editorial decisions, see the section Editorial Practices.
Letter from John Henderson to his Mother, February 14, 1863
Henderson, John, fl. 1863



Page 1
Chapel Hill N.C. Feby 14th

My Dear Mother

I was rather disappointed in your last letters; I expected you would have received a letter from Len long ere this. His letter however will be so much the more welcomed, when it does come; for I must suppose, that he will write at some time.
The enrolling officer has been here; he carried several of the students to the conscript camp at Raleigh, where they were immediately sworn in as soldiers in the armies of the Confederate States. They were furloughed for ten days. He gave the substitute men a little respite but gave notice that he would return for them the first of next month. In consequence of this conscription, the Sophomore class has dwindled down to a mere skeleton. I was sorry to see the young fellows leave, some of them intimate friends. They all went off in fine spirits and will no doubt make excellent soldiers. They of course will choose their companies as they have the privilege of volunteering. Four of them

Page 2
have gone to Wilmington in order to be allowed to volunteer in some of the companies stationed at the forts at the mouth of the Cape Fear. As I said above these young men will make excellent soldiers; for who ever heard of a collegiate deserting or showing the white feather? Juniors of course, being exempted, were not disturbed in any way thus far [by] enrolling officers.
You have been writing me word of the prevalence of Small pox in Salisbury, but I although it has been prevailing for some time past in Chapel Hill have failed to inform you of the fact. It has disappeared, I understand at last; in fact I don't think there was but one case in the place: and he died through the want of attention. At the time the man was taken with it, doctor Jones was absent from the Hill. None of the remaining doctors would attend him. When Dr Jones did return disease combined with inattention had done its work. No new case has yet appeared, but there is no telling when one will appear.
I wish you would ascertain, for certain, whether I can procure Kent's commentaries from my grandfathers library; for if I cannot I will have to endeavor to procure it from another quarter. My expenses this session I cannot estimate under eight hundred dollars. Board has risen to an hundred and ten. I need twenty dollars at present

Page 3
which I wish you would send in your next letter. In about a month more, I will have to make upon you a much larger demand. You may rely on this, however, that I will not spend more than is absolutely necessary.

Your aff. son

John