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Title: Letter from John Henderson to his mother, Mary Ferrand Henderson, September 26, 1864 : Electronic Edition.
Author: Henderson, John, fl. 1863
Funding from the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supported the electronic publication of this title.
Text transcribed by Bari Helms
Images scanned by Caitlin R. Donnelly
Text encoded by Caitlin R. Donnelly
First Edition, 2007
Size of electronic edition: ca. 16K
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2007
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text
The electronic edition is a part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2007-05-26, Caitlin R. Donnelly finished TEI/XML encoding.
Source(s):
Title of collection: John Steele Henderson Papers (#327), Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Title of document: Letter from John Henderson to his mother, Mary Ferrand Henderson, September 26, 1864
Author: John
Description: 2 pages, 3 page images
Note: Call number 327 (Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Editorial practices
The text has been encoded using the recommendations for Level 5 of the TEI in Libraries Guidelines.
Originals are in the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
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Letter from John Henderson to his mother, Mary Ferrand Henderson, September 26, 1864
Henderson, John, fl. 1863



Page [1]
Chapel Hill N. C. Sept 26 1864

My Dear Mother

(In great haste) Governour Swain tells me that he has seen it stated, that capt Robert Gillespie did survive the Revolution but only a very short period He doesent remember where or by whom or under what circumstances he was informed of the fact. I suppose you may safely rely upon this; for if there is any man in the state of North Carolina, who is conversant with its history D. L. Swain is that man. I went to see the governour a few days ago and he very kindly showed me a great many rare and valuable manuscripts, curiosities etc, etc. I saw the original portraits of George III and his queen, which formerly hung up in the sitting room of Mrs Elizabeth Steele with the writing plainly eligible on the former — "Oh George hide thy face and mourn." These pictures are in a tolerably fair state of preservation; but unless something is done to keep them in this state, they will after a few years be numbered among the things that were. I saw also an engraving (I reckon thats what you call it) done up in Paris, representing Mrs Steele handing Gen. Greene two purses of gold. I mean to visit governour Swains again to examine more minutely his rare and choice library.

Page [2]
To be able to gratify my curiosity by visiting such a select collection of books as his is what I most of all take pride in. Such recreations as these are decidedly in accordance with my turn of mind, my tastes, and sentiments. The love of reading is hereditary in the Henderson family and it has always been a matter of surprise to me that father never desired or at least never endeavoured to have a fine library; for with him reading is not a mere passion but something almost akin to disease. One of the most ambitious hopes of my life is to be enabled to collect materials full enough for a detailed history of my ancestors both on my father's and mother's side. Strange as it may seem I can go no further on my paternal side than Samuel Henderson. The name of Henderson is even now illustrious in England and Scotland I have an idea that we are all from the same common stem; but it may be years and years before I can ascertain the relationship. I received a letter from Baldy Boyden this morning of as late a date as the twentieth; has been in bad health but is improving at present. Tell father I will most certainly not lose my heart here. This is the last place in the world I should like to marry. The social atmosphere is too impure. I am enjoying good health but yet I have lately been subject to cold night sweats. Can you suggest no remedy. Col. Saunders is still here; appears weak and feeble, cannot be very well. I see him every day or two. Love to all. Farewell.

John




Page [3]
I am certain I am related to Dr Mallets family. I was told so some years ago and I think you were my informant, tho, of course I will not be certain about that. His wife was from Fayetteville. So also was your grandmother. Endeavour to recall your confused ideas to some order and I think perhaps you may see the link which connects us. It is a matter of little consequence to me except that I would like to be convinced of the fact. I know almost every lady in C. Hill that I would desire to know. I wouldent pay a great sum for the knowledge I have of them either