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Title: Letter from Edmund Jones to his father, Edmund W. Jones, August 26, 1867 (In Which He Comments on the University's Debts) : Electronic Edition.
Author: Jones, Edmund
Funding from the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supported the electronic publication of this title.
Text transcribed by Bari Helms
Images scanned by Caitlin R. Donnelly
Text encoded by Caitlin R. Donnelly
First Edition, 2007
Size of electronic edition: ca. 16K
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2007
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text
The electronic edition is a part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2007-05-27, Caitlin R. Donnelly finished TEI/XML encoding.
Source(s):
Title of collection: Edmund Walter Jones Papers (#3543), Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Title of document: Letter from Edmund Jones to his father, Edmund W. Jones, August 26, 1867 (In Which He Comments on the University's Debts)
Author: E. Jones
Description: 4 pages, 4 page images
Note: Call number 3543 (Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
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Letter from Edmund Jones to his father, Edmund W. Jones, August 26, 1867 (In Which He Comments on the University's Debts)
Jones, Edmund



Page [1]
University of N. C. Aug 26th 69

My Dear Father,

Thinking that perhaps by this time you might feel some inclination to hear how matters are going on at the Hill, I will endeavor to portray the situation as well as posible. I have but awaited the development of things, so that when I wrote I could give you something of interest, if I fail it will not be on account of my want of inclination. I am somewhat at a loss to come to a definite conclusion as to the future of our University, but this much I think can safely be counted on, (i e) that this is the last session here, or at all events the last in its present state. There must be either a great

Page [2]
reaction or else the institution is bound to go down. Now the question is which shall it be. In calmly weighing the arguments pro & con, I am afraid that the old University must suffer a temporary eclipse, unless promptly sustained by the state legislature, which I fear will not be the case, even supposing that they are allowed to meet; there is evidently a strong feeling now against the University, it is looked upon by the more ignorant (which class including sundry petty demagogues I am sorry to say is now in the ascendancy) as a monopolizer: they will start the old song of only rich mens sons being educated here, which with a population the most ignorant in the U. S. will have great weight. So it is not saying too much, when I assert that we are to look to the legislature for nothing. And now what can the trustees do by themselves. In the first place there are over sixty of said body, two thirds of whom

Page [3]
have never attended a meeting, that certainly shows great interest in its welfare, & even at this important crisis there is barely a quorum in Raleigh, in this respect I think our Uncle Gen S. F. P. & his son R. L. ditto: have been somewhat remiss, & there is Hon B. S. Gaither who has for twenty years been a trustee, & has never attended a meeting yet. The Faculty have I understand upon good authority all resigned. Gov Swain's resignation has been accepted & I don't know how many of the Prof's will be, in its present state of finance I don't see how their places are to be supplied. It strikes me that with no endowment & $25,000 in debt besides the strong feeling against it, that it will be imposible to do so.
On the other hand the Trustees at least those who seem disposed to do any thing seem determined to make it as high in standing as ever. I understand that they have disposed of the land script for $135,000

Page [4]
This will of course go far toward helping us out of the dificulty, but it may safely be estimated that it will take $50,000 to pay its debts & reorganize the faculty, leaving no immense sum for a reserve. The question then arises who can be procured as president & where is an able faculty to come from? If it is successfully started again there will be a thorough change, the general opinion is that the Elective system will be chosen, which I think will be the best. Sam is pleased & seems to be studying, sends much love. Where is Annie & Renee now, if in the Valley give them my love & tell Annie to write to me, or if she prefers it I will write to her first. Tell Mollie I will write to her before long. I will keep you posted as to University matters. (A hundred or so would not come amiss?) We will have an interesting game of base ball here next saturday for the champion ball of the state which we now hold. The Crescents of Raleigh play us. My love to all, &

I am your aff son

E. Jones