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North Carolina Day. Friday, November 11th, 1921. Armistice Day. North Carolina in the World War:
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North Carolina. Dept. of Public Instruction


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(title page) North Carolina Day. Friday, November 11th, 1921. Armistice Day. North Carolina in the World War
North Carolina. Dept. of Public Instruction
72 p.
Raleigh, N. C.
Published by the State Superintendent of Public Instruction
1921
Call number Cp 970 N87p (North Carolina Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)


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EDUCATIONAL PUBLICATION NO. 28

DIVISION OF PUBLICATION NO. 3

NORTH CAROLINA DAY
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11TH, 1921
ARMISTICE DAY
NORTH CAROLINA
IN
THE WORLD WAR

PUBLISHED BY THE
STATE SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
RALEIGH, N. C.


Page 2


                         Thrones shall crumble, Kings shall perish,
                         Howsoe'er their legions strive;
                         But the liberties men cherish,
                         They shall triumph and survive.

--Clinton Scollard.


Page 3

CELEBRATE ARMISTICE DAY AS NORTH CAROLINA DAY

        The Superintendent of Public Instruction is directed by law to set apart one day in each year to be known as North Carolina Day, and to publish suitable material for use in the proper observance of this day in the schools of the State.

        November 11th, or Armistice Day, is accordingly set apart to be observed by the schools of the State as North Carolina Day. It is fitting that the schools should observe this day. Teachers and pupils should study what our heroic and patriotic citizens did during that memorable crisis when our lives were in danger and our liberties were at stake.

        November 11th is both a State and National holiday. It is set apart and should be devoted to a commemoration of the deeds of our soldiers and all other patriotic citizens, who by their work, courage, and thrift saved the world from a greater catastrophe even than war.

        This bulletin, therefore, has been prepared in order to give the teacher a wide range of material from which to make selections for the Armistice Day program and to give the pupils a simple historical background for the proper celebration of this day. The valuable historical material incorporated herein should be used in classroom lessons, especially in the teachings of history, civics, and language. The pupils should be encouraged to work up their own readings from a study of the texts and from other sources. Our country's honor-roll should be worked up from the list of citations published herein and also from local sources of information concerning the dead. The local post of the American Legion, if there is one, could help prepare this list. In this way the real meaning of North Carolina's part in the World War may be brought to our boys and girls.

        Teachers should tell the story of how all the people coöperated to destroy the forces of evil and to make this world a better place in which to live. They should be taught to honor all patriotic citizens, and should be led to see that both in times of war and in times of peace he or she may be a soldier of liberty who fights the common enemies of our country. What are our common enemies? Not only hostile foreigners, but sloth, cowardice, ignorance, and disease, and it is our duty to fight them with work, courage, thrift, and intelligence.

        If the short-term schools in some counties have not opened by November 11th, a day should be set apart either in November or December for the proper observance of North Carolina Day.

        We are indebted to Mr. R. B. House, the Collector of War Records of the North Carolina Historical Commission, Raleigh, North Carolina, for the preparation of this bulletin.

E. W. Brooks
State Superintendent Public Instruction.


Page 4

CONTENTS


Page 5


Page 6

OUR DEAD OVERSEAS

EDWIN MARKHAM
(Written for Armistice Day)


                         They sleep; they took the chance
                         In Italy, in Belgium, in France;
                         For us they gave their youth to its last breath;
                         For us they plunged on into the gulf of death.


                         With high heroic heart
                         They did their valiant part.
                         They gave the grace and glory of their youth
                         To lie in heaps uncouth.
                         They turned from these bright skies
                         To lie with dust and silence on their eyes. . . . . . . .


                         They are not dead; life's flag is never furled;
                         They passed from world to world.
                         Their bodies sleep, but in some nobler land
                         Their spirits march under a new command.
                         New joys await them there
                         In hero heavens wrapt in immortal air.


                         Rejoice for them, rejoice;
                         They made the nobler choice.
                         How shall we honor their deed--
                         How speak our praise of this immortal breed?
                         Only by living nobly as they died--
                         Toiling for Truth denied,
                         Loyal to something bigger than we are--
                         Something that swings the spirit to a star.

--Literary Digest.


Page 7

IN FLANDERS FIELDS

By LIEUT. COL. JOHN MCCARE


                         In Flanders fields the poppies blow
                         Between the crosses, row on row,
                         That mark our place; and in the sky
                         The larks, still bravely singing, fly,
                         Scarce heard amidst the guns below.
                         We are the dead. Short days ago
                         We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
                         Loved and were loved, and now we lie
                         In Flanders fields.


                         Take up our quarrel with the foe!
                         To you from falling hands we throw
                         The torch. Be yours to hold it high!
                         If ye break faith with us who die,
                         We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
                         In Flanders fields.

AMERICA'S ANSWER

By R. W. LILLARD


                         Rest ye in peace, ye Flanders dead.
                         The fight that ye so bravely led
                         We've taken up. And we will keep
                         True faith with you who lie asleep
                         With each a cross to mark his bed,
                         And poppies blowing overhead,
                         Where once his own life-blood ran red,
                         So let your rest be sweet and deep
                         In Flanders fields.


                         Fear not that ye have died for naught.
                         The torch ye threw to us, we caught.
                         Ten million hands will hold it high,
                         And Freedom's light shall never die!
                         We've learned the lesson that ye taught
                         In Flanders fields.


Page 8

THEY FOUGHT FOR YOU


                         Soldiers in homespun,
                         Soldiers in blue,
                         Soldiers in khaki,
                         All fought for you.
                         Soldiers of fortune,
                         With Fortune's hands bring
                         Field flowers and home flowers--
                         A glad offering
                         For those who on battlefields
                         Suffered and bled.
                         Honor the soldiers,
                         Living or dead.
                         Soldiers in homespun,
                         Soldiers in blue,
                         Soldiers in khaki,
                         All fought for you!

--Vermont Normal School Bulletin.

THE AMERICAN FLAG

(By three small girls--first one to be dressed in red, the next in white, and the third in blue, and each waving a flag.)


                         ALL--We wear today the colors
                         To which our men are true;
                         Long may they wave above us,
                         The red, the white, the blue.


                         RED--Bright as the rays of the morning
                         When comes the dawn's first gleam,
                         Within our much-loved banner
                         The crimson bars are seen.


                         WHITE--Pure as the snowflakes falling
                         Or early morning light,
                         Among the bars of crimson
                         Appear the bars of white.


                         BLUE--Bright as the sky at evening
                         When gleam the stars of night,
                         The blue within our banner
                         Enfolds the stars of white.


                         ALL--The red, white, and blue,
                         Forever "shall wave
                         O'er the land of the free
                         And the home of the brave!"

--Oregon Memorial Day Annual.


Page 9

HOW THE WORLD WAR CAME TO THE UNITED STATES

        On June 29, 1914, we read in our newspapers that Prince Ferdinand of Austria had been killed while visiting a town in one of his provinces. Prince Ferdinand was the heir to the throne of Austria-Hungary. His murder was a terrible thing. We thought of it as the crime of some fanatic like the murder of Presidents Lincoln, Garfield, and McKinley in America. We thought the murderer would be caught and punished, and that that would be the end of it. Few people thought that the murder of an Austrian prince would plunge the whole world into a war when the murder of our presidents had not even caused a riot.

        But within a few days after this crime every great country in Europe was at war. As the war went on, first one country, then another came into it. Finally America entered this great war, too.

        This war lasted nearly five years, with terrible results. Seven million soldiers were killed. Twenty-five million more were wounded. Many millions of men, women, and children starved to death, or died of sickness. Many cities were destroyed. The governments in many countries were broken up. All the money that Europe had spent in a hundred years to make people well and happy would not equal the money spent in this great war. How could the murder of one man cause all this misery?

        The answer is, because of the German Kaiser. He used this murder as an excuse to start a war he had been planning for many years. He wanted to conquer the whole world. He broke solemn treaties and made war on innocent peoples. He broke the laws of warfare, and killed old people and little babies. He used poisoned gas on the battlefield, against all the laws of war. He sent airships to wreck hospitals where sick soldiers were lying, and to destroy peaceful villages. He broke the laws of the sea. He sank hospital ships that could not fight at all. He sank the ships of neutral nations, and left their crews to perish in boats. He sank the merchant ships of hostile countries without warning and killed innocent people. He sank without warning the Lusitania and killed women and little babies. (Among these were over a hundred American citizens.) Then he gave the school children in Germany a holiday as if he had done some great thing. He respected no law and no people that stood in the way of his greed, ambition, and tyranny.

        The Kaiser had persuaded Austria-Hungary to join him in his plans. He was waiting for an excuse to start a war when the Austrian prince was killed. The man who killed the Austrian prince was a Serbian. Kaiser William said to Austria, "We will blame Serbia for this, declare war on her, and conquer her."

        But when they declared war on Serbia, Russia came to her aid, and with Russia came France. Russia was the kinsman and protector of Serbia, and France was the friend of Russia.


Page 10

        The German Kaiser thought he could whip both Russia and France. Therefore, he declared war on them both. He planned to throw a great army quickly into France, whip the French, and then send all his forces against Russia. France and Germany touch each other for many miles. But France had so many forts along this frontier that the Kaiser knew he could not get through them quickly. But between France and Germany on the west lies Belgium, a level country without strong forts. The Kaiser planned to go into France through Belgium. He wanted Belgium to join him in the war by letting his armies march through to France. For Belgium, because it is level and easy to march in, had long been the battleground of Europe. But Belgium many years before had promised the other European nations that she would remain neutral in any wars between them if they would not try to march their armies through her lands. All the great nations of Europe agreed to this. The Kaiser, also, had solemnly promised not to march into Belgium. But now he said to the Belgians:

        "I am going to break my promise. You will have to let my armies through or fight."


        The Belgians replied:

        "We will fight, then!" and all the world honors Belgium for this brave answer.

        The Kaiser invaded Belgium and did many horrible things. He burned her cities. He murdered her innocent people. He made slaves of many more, and took them into Germany. His invasion of Belgium brought Great Britain into the war, because she had promised to defend the neutrality of Belgium.

        Although the Kaiser had built a great navy, it was nothing to compare with that of Great Britain. The British ships quickly ran all the German ships off the seas, and blockaded all the German ports. No ship could get in or out of Germany. The Kaiser's people could not make enough provisions and ammunition for his armies. He could not trade with the outside world. He was afraid he would have to give up the war.

        But he had one resource left. He had many submarines. These could slip by the English ships and get out on the high seas. There they began to sink, without a word of warning, all ships going to or from England. This was against the laws of war even when he sank English ships. For when a war-ship sinks the merchant ship of a hostile nation, it must give warning so that the sailors and passengers can save themselves. For they are noncombatants. But the Kaiser went even further. He sank the ships of any nation without any warning at all. In this way he sank over a thousand ships of neutral nations. All of these nations protested in the name of the law. But the Kaiser said:

        "I will not respect the law of the high seas. I will conquer them, too."


        Many of these nations were not able to protect their ships. But America was able. She warned the Kaiser from the very first that to


Page 11

sink American ships would mean war. The Kaiser knew this, but he thought he could whip America, too. He went on from one crime to another against us, and we realized his evil plans against our country, Then America came into the war with all her might. She joined forces with the Allies in a solemn agreement not to stop until the Kaiser was whipped forever.

OUR RECORD IN THE WORLD WAR

        The people of America went into the war with all their might. They had but one thought--to free the world from the fear and tyranny of Germany. Thousands of men rushed into the army and navy. Thousands of men and women became nurses and welfare workers in the camps. Millions joined the Red Cross, the Young Men's Christian Association, the Knights of Columbus, the Salvation Army, and other societies to care for the health, the comfort, and the pleasure of the soldiers. Business men left their factories and offices to work for the government without pay. Almost everybody made sacrifices to save food and fuel for our armies and those of our allies. From the pockets of the people billions of dollars poured into the United States Treasury to pay for these things.

        The Government itself made great preparations for war. Many new warships were built, and the navy was greatly increased. Plans were made to raise and train an army of many millions. Thirty-seven great training camps were built. Hundreds of factories were changed from making peace-time articles to making munitions of war. The government took charge of railroads, telegraph lines, and shipping companies in order to hasten soldiers and supplies to Europe.

        Eight hundred thousand men were enrolled in our navy. A powerful fleet of ships was sent to Europe, where it joined the British fleet in protecting our ships and those of our friends. Our navy fought no great naval battle because the German ships were afraid to come out and fight. But it kept faithful watch over the German submarines and destroyed many of them. Day and night, in calm and in storms, and in the bitter cold of the North Sea, our sailors did their work. Together with the British, they kept the seas safe for America and her allies.

        Four million men were enrolled in the American army. Of these over 2,000,000 went to France and fought there in the great battles of 1918. At Chateau-Thierry, Belleau Wood, St. Mihiel, Bellicourt, and in the Argonne Forest they bore their share in some of the greatest battles in all the history of the world. Time after time they defeated some of Germany's best veterans.

        In this great national effort each state did its full share. No state has cause to boast over any other state, for all served alike.


Page 12

        

Illustration

Salisbury Canteen, Christmas, 1917. This Canteen gave a turkey dinner to every soldier passing through Salisbury on Christmas Day.

        

Illustration

Serving refreshments to soldiers passing through Raleigh.


Page 13

        North Carolina boys rushed across to join the allies in the early days of the war. Some of these, like Kiffin Rockwell and James McConnell, were great fighters. Some of them, like Robert Bridgers, drove ambulances and cared for the wounded. North Carolina women went, too, as nurses and workers in the camps and hospitals.

        Seventy-three thousand North Carolinians went into the army; 9,000 went into the navy and the marine corps. These men were in every division of the regular army that fought in France, and on every ship that served on the seas. One of our own divisions, the 30th, broke the Hindenburg line in the most famous battle of the war. Another of our own divisions, the 81st, was moving victoriously through the Argonne Woods when the Amistice was signed.

        North Carolina gave $160,000,000 in Liberty Bonds and War Savings Stamps, and over $3,000,000 to the Red Cross and other societies working for the soldiers. Thousands of our citizens worked to make comforts and necessities for the soldiers. We made over 2,500,000 articles for their use. Josephus Daniels, Secretary of the Navy, was a North Carolinian; Walter Hines Page, the ambassador to England, was also a North Carolinian. North Carolina business men, lawyers, doctors and others served throughout the war without pay. No call for men, for money, for work, for aid of any kind was made in vain to North Carolina.

NORTH CAROLINA'S WAR RECORD (A TABLE)


Page 14

Illustration

The Raleigh Canteen.
Over 250,000 soldiers were served meals by this Canteen.
To the right appears the bath-house.


Page 15

HOW WE HELPED THE GOVERNMENT

        By watching Europe at war for three years our Government had learned to organize for the war. It had learned how to provide the five great necessities of a nation at war: men, money, food, fuel, and the coöperation of all the people. To provide these things the Government organized the draft boards to get men, the Liberty Loan committees to get money, the food administration to get food, the fuel administration to get fuel, and the Council of Defense to see that every one had something to do.

        Over a million men volunteered in the army and navy. Many more would have volunteered, but the Government chose a better way to raise men. This was by the draft. The draft law required every man between 18 and 45 years of age to register at a bureau in his home community. Then as the men were needed, they were called into service from every part of the country. There were few people who opposed the draft. The men called into service went gladly, and thousands of men and women helped administer the draft without one cent of pay.

        Many interesting stories are told about the draft. One especially shows a fine sense of honor and patriotism. A boy in one of the western counties of North Carolina appeared before the draft board in his county and asked to be sent into the army at once. He was asked why he did not wait until he was called in regular order. He replied that he wanted to redeem the honor of his family. He told how a relative of his had been called into service in the Civil War and had deserted from the army. The boy had always felt disgraced by this uncle's cowardice, and he wanted to honor his family by his own services in this war. He was sent to camp, where he made a fine record.

        In another North Carolina county a boy was called up for service, but never appeared before the board. He was branded as a deserter and hunted for throughout the whole time of the war. Finally he was discovered. He had imagined that he would not get to France quickly enough through the draft; therefore, when he was called up, he changed his name, ran away, and joined the regular army. He got into trouble for thus violating the draft law, but the Government pardoned him because of his brave spirit.

        There are many stories of bravery and patriotism told about the draft. There are also stories of cowardly and ignorant men, for not all men are what they ought to be. But the records show that only a few North Carolinians deserted from the army. By far the greater part of these were poor, ignorant men, who did not understand what the Government wanted them to do. As soon as they understood that they were to fight to protect their country they went gladly to war.

        These deserters were ignorant. Many of them could not read or write. Therefore, they could not understand what the war was about. Ignorant


Page 16

people like this are a great danger to a nation, because they are so easily deceived. This is shown by a disaster that happened to the Italian army in 1917. Italy spends so much money for her army and navy that she has little left for schools. Consequently many of the Italian soldiers never learned to read and write. The Germans knew this, and kept spreading false reports by spies in the Italian army. These spies told the soldiers that the war was nearly over, and that Germany was not going to attack Italy any more. So many of the soldiers believed these rumors that the Italian army became careless on the battlefield. Then Germany made a big attack and came near destroying the whole Italian army.

        The Germans tried to play the same tricks on our soldiers, but they were too well informed. The ignorant men called into our armies were sent to school by the Government. For a man who cannot read and write cannot learn how to use the weapons, maps and books that a soldier must use in modern warfare.

        The Government needed billions of dollars to carry on the war. There was no way to get this money quickly except by borrowing it from the people. People had to be persuaded to lend their money to the Government. They were persuaded by the Liberty Loan speakers. In every community in the United States patriotic citizens went about explaining to the people why it was necessary to lend their money to the Government. They showed how the man who loaned money to the Government would both save money and help the Government, too. Success everywhere met their efforts. Not a single state failed to raise the amount asked of it. North Carolina raised $160,000,000, which was $10,000,000 more than was asked. Mr. Joseph G. Brown and Mr. John W. Fries directed the work of raising money in North Carolina. Most of the people understood that the Government was simply borrowing the money, and would surely pay it back. But an old negro farmer in Nash County was surprised to learn that he would be repaid. He had given three hundred dollars to the Government, as he thought. He said people ought to give money when boys were giving their lives.

        It meant a sacrifice for many of the people to spare their money. One North Carolina woman, a widow, loaned the Government one hundred dollars. The money she put down was all in dimes. It was learned that for many years she had been saving ten cents at a time from her earnings. Now she was willing to turn it all over to her country. Rich and poor, men, women, and children--all loaned their money to help win the war.

        All over the world men had stopped raising food because they had to enter the army to fight. Many thousand farms had been ruined by the contending armies. People cannot work and fight without plenty of food. Experience taught us that food would win the war. Our Government organized the Food Administration to produce food and to save it. The United States had to feed not only its own people, but its allies.


Page 17

        Every one was urged to plant food crops and to raise cattle and poultry. The burden of raising food of course fell on the farmers. But in towns and cities home-owners planted gardens. People were urged not to leave a foot of land unplanted with food crops. Those who had no land to plant were urged to work on the farms and gardens. Even school children were asked to plant gardens at school. In military camps in this country and in France there were many war gardens.

        All the people were glad to raise food, but it was hard to get them to save it. The average American family throws away enough food to support an extra person. When our troops passed through England, the English government sent special men to our mess halls to pick up and save the food we threw away. Restaurants, hotels, and dining cars especially wasted food by serving too large portions to guests. Sugar, wheat and beef were the things most wasted, and at the same time most needed. Our people began to save food as soon as they had their attention called to the need. Skillful people prepared all sorts of dishes from oats, corn meal, molasses, fish, and such things, and saved the beef, sugar and wheat for our soldiers and our allies.

        In each county of the State were committees to help save food. Mr. Henry A. Page, of Aberdeen, directed the production and saving of food for the whole State of North Carolina.

        Fuel was just as necessary as food. The chief fuel of the world is coal. So many men were taken from the mines to fight that coal was scarce all over the world. Moreover, the winter of 1917-1918 was one of the most severe we have ever had. Factories had to keep going to make munitions and clothing, and people had to be kept warm.

        The Government organized the Fuel Administration to regulate the supply of fuel. When there was plenty of wood, as in North Carolina, little coal was allowed. Of course we had to have coal for our factories and our light and power plants. Where there was little wood, as in New England, much more coal was allowed. The people were glad to save fuel. Mr. A. W. McAllister and Mr. R. C. Norfleet directed the fuel-saving work in North Carolina.

        Thousands of people were ready to help the Government. They simply wanted to know how to go about it. The Government, therefore, organized the Council of Defense to show the people how to help the Government. There were small councils of defense in every county, and at the head of all of these smaller councils in each state was one large council. Dr. D. H. Hill directed the North Carolina Council of Defense.

        The members of the Council of Defense served in many ways. They kept watch in every neighborhood against traitors and slackers. They helped sell liberty bonds and war savings stamps. They encouraged the people to plant gardens and showed them how. They raised money for


Page 18

the Red Cross and other welfare organizations. Wherever anything worth while was going on in the State there was a Council of Defense busily at work.

        The result of all these efforts was a state united, with men, women and children at work. Men, money, food, fuel and help never failed. These great organizations took the time, strength and money of thousands of our citizens. But all gave themselves freely. Joseph G. Brown, John W. Fries, Henry A. Page, A. W. McAllister, R. C. Norfleet, D. H. Hill, all served without pay as directors for the whole State. In every county prominent citizens likewise gave their services to the Government as soldiers of liberty.

WELFARE WORK AT HOME AND ABROAD

        The people of North Carolina not only furnished soldiers to the Government, they also sent welfare workers to the camps and to France to care for them. They formed societies at home to make clothing, bandages and comforts for the soldiers. They took care of the relatives of soldiers who needed any kind of help. Moreover, they helped many other people who needed aid for any reason.

        The greatest of all our welfare organizations was the Red Cross. In every neighborhood throughout the land there were branches of the Red Cross. In North Carolina there were 250,000 members. These patriotic workers made over 2,500,000 articles for the soldiers. They sent men and women to the camps in this country, and to France to nurse and care for the soldiers. One North Carolina girl went to Belgium in 1914 as a British Red Cross nurse. She served throughout the war, and was under fire most of the time. For her service she has been decorated by France, Belgium, and Great Britain. Her name is Madelon Battle Hancock. She was born in Asheville and now lives in England.

        While the Red Cross was serving the soldiers so nobly, a new call was made on it here at home. A dread disease called influenza swept over the land killing many thousand people. Often all the members of a whole family would be stricken with no one to care for them. Often people would be stricken who were too poor to get a doctor or a nurse. In all such cases the Red Cross organized hospitals, and sent doctors and nurses to care for the sick. Many of these doctors and nurses fell sick and died in this service. They, too, were heroic soldiers fighting a terrible enemy.

        A fine branch of the Red Cross work was the canteen, as the service station at the railroad stations was called. These canteens furnished hot meals and other comforts to soldiers passing through on troop trains. A famous canteen was at Raleigh. It served over 250,000 soldiers, and never failed to meet any demand on it.


Page 19

        Akin to the Red Cross was the War Camp Community Service in all towns near which soldiers were encamped. This organization entertained the soldiers as the guests of the towns. Raleigh, Fayetteville, Charlotte, Wilmington, and Southport, had active organizations of this kind. There were also the Y. M. C. A., the Knights of Columbus, the Jewish Welfare Board, the churches, and many others working for the welfare of the soldiers. Thousands of North Carolinians did actual work in these organizations. The people of the State gave over $3,000,000 to help them in their work.

        

Illustration

Sniper of the 30th Division in the trenches in Belgium.


Page 20

        

Illustration

Soldiers of the 322d Infantry on November 11, 1918. They have just received news that the armistice has been signed and have stopped their advance against the Germans and are preparing dinner.

        

Illustration

Entrance to the great St. Quentin tunnel on the Hindenburg Line. This tunnel runs for several miles underground. It was used as a German dugout to protect thousands of men from artillery fire. Our men of the 30th Division took this tunnel at the point of the bayonet.


Page 21

SOME STORIES OF SERVICE

        "With high heroic heart, They did their valiant part!"

EDWARD KIDDER GRAHAM

        We have learned how great and busy men gave their services to the Government without pay. They sold liberty bonds, worked to save food and fuel, helped to raise the army, and worked for the Red Cross and other welfare organizations. There were hundreds of men and women who served the Government in this way. We honor all of them as unselfish and good citizens. We honor in particular Edward Kidder Graham because of the greatness and goodness of his life and because he gave his life in the service.

        Edward Kidder Graham was the President of our State University. He began his work in life as a teacher, and he died while working as a teacher and example to all of us. He was born at Charlotte, North Carolina, October 11, 1876. After preparing for college in his native city he entered the University of North Carolina in 1894. At the University he was a fine student, a keen debater, and a brilliant writer. His classmates honored him for these qualities. But they honored him even more as a clean, fair, and sportsmanlike man. He knew how to lead men. His fellow students said that Ed Graham had a habit of being right.

        Soon after he graduated in 1898, he began to teach in the University. He was a wonderful teacher because he knew young men and could inspire and guide them. His fame as a teacher went all over the country, and many great colleges asked him to leave the University and come teach for them. They offered him money and positions greater than the University could give him at the time. But Edward Graham would never leave the University because he loved it. The University rewarded him for his loving service by giving him positions of high trust and honor.

        Finally in 1915 he was made President of the University. All the State rejoiced in the honor that had come to him. He inspired the students and teachers in the University, and the people of the State, so that never before had North Carolina believed more in education. He worked day and night guiding the University and the State toward better citizenship. Education and Citizenship were his watchwords.

        Then came the war. No man knew better than Edward Kidder Graham why we were in the war, and how we must work to win it. He offered his services to the Government, though he was already hard


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worked with his duties as president of the University. He helped organize the schools of the country to study the war. He helped direct the Council of Defense for the whole United States. He helped direct the Young Men's Christian Association in its work all over the world, and he had special charge of the colleges in the South Atlantic States which were training young men for the army.

        These duties were more than any one man could discharge. Therefore Edward Kidder Graham destroyed his health by hard work. He became sick with influenza, and because he was so weakened by overwork he could not resist the disease. He died October 26, 1918.

        The United States lost in him one of its right-hand men. North Carolina lost in him a great leader. Men who had studied and worked with him mourned for him as a friend. His was a great and strong life which he gave in service to humanity. Edward Kidder Graham was a soldier of liberty.

KIFFIN YATES ROCKWELL

        On September 23, 1916, the world learned that the aviator Kiffin Rockwell was dead. He had fallen in an air battle in France. Both enemy and friend paid tribute to Rockwell's memory, because of his bravery and skill. He was a leader in that group of men who left their own peaceful countries to fight for France. They believed that France was protecting the rights of the whole world.

        Kiffin Rockwell was an American. He was born in Tennessee, but he lived most of his life in North Carolina. For this reason North Carolina claims him, too, and honors his memory.

        Kiffin Rockwell and his brother Paul loved France. Their ancestors were French, and these two boys decided long before the war came that they would fight for France if she was ever attacked by Germany.

        When France was attacked by Germany in 1914 they went at once to France and joined the French army. Their regiment was the Foreign Legion. It was given this name because it was made up of men from all over the world who wanted to fight for France. In it were many boys from the United States. Victor Chapman, James McConnell, Norman Prince, are the names of some of them. All these men gave their lives for France. All of them are honored as heroes. None of them has greater fame than Kiffin Rockwell. James McConnell was also a North Carolinian. Kiffin and his brother Paul fought for over a year in the trenches. Both received serious wounds. Paul was crippled so that he could not fight any more. Kiffin got well and strong again. He left the Foreign Legion and became an aviator. Then he joined the Lafayette squadron of France and became a great air fighter. May 18, 1916, he brought down the first German plane that was brought down by


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an American. Soon he brought down more. It was said of him: "Where Rockwell is the Germans cannot pass." He would never rest except when his airplane needed gas or repairs. As soon as his plane was ready, off he would go in search of the Germans. He gained the highest honors that France can bestow on a soldier, but he said, "I am only paying the debt America owes to France."

        Rockwell fought over a hundred battles in the air. But on September 23, 1916, while he was fighting a German plane, a machine-gun bullet struck him in the eye. The great aviator fell to the earth dead. His comrades said. "The best and bravest of us is no more."

        In 1916 few Americans thought we would get into the war. We could not understand why American boys should want to give their lives for France. Even Kiffin Rockwell's mother could not see for a long time why he should fight for France. But Kiffin wrote to her one day and said:

        "If I die I want you to know that I have died as every man ought to die--fighting for what is right. I do not feel that I am fighting for France alone, but for the cause of all humanity--the greatest of all causes."


        In a little while the United States was in this war. Like Kiffin Rockwell, we fought for all humanity against Germany. For this reason we honor Kiffin Rockwell as a pioneer. He led us in a crusade for humanity.

ROBERT LESTER BLACKWELL

        Of the 82,000 North Carolinians who went into the army and navy, some died gloriously on the field of battle; some died from horrible wounds; some died of disease. Others went through the same dangers without a scratch. Others never went to France at all, but served here at home.

        Why was this so? The answer is--the fortunes of war. When a man joins the army of his country he lays aside for the time his own will and interests. It is not what he wants, but what his superiors think best that he does. This is true from the humblest private to the commanding general of all the armies.

        The watchword of the army is service. Service means to obey orders. That is what every soldier is trained to do. He is trained to fear neither death nor suffering. He is trained to fear only failure to do his duty.

        All soldiers were serving; all had to bear the fortunes of war. One might die a glorious death; another might suffer a broken body; another might not receive a scratch. Some soldiers might go to great adventures in strange countries; others might drill and labor in training camps in their home country, but whatever fortune of war the good soldier met


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with, he met it in the name of service to his country. An example of the greatest service is Robert Lester Blackwell.

        Robert Lester Blackwell was a farmer boy. He was born in Hurdle Mills in Person County, North Carolina. When the war broke out he joined the 119th infantry and went abroad to fight. He served with honor in Belgium and on the Hindenburg line at Bellicourt. On October 11, 1918, in a great battle before St. Souplet in France, he and a few of his comrades were cut off from their regiment by the German artillery fire. They knew that unless some one carried a message back to the regiment all of them would be captured or killed. They knew also that any man who tried to get through the German fire would probably be killed. The commanding officer asked for volunteers to carry the message. Without hesitation Blackwell stepped forward. He took the message and plunged into the hail of shells that churned up every foot of the ground. A shell struck him and the brave soldier fell dead.

        In memory of this brave deed Congress gave to Blackwell's father a beautiful medal of honor, the highest honor our country can bestow on a soldier. Throughout all the country was read the order citing his bravery for an act that was "above and beyond the call of duty."

        Robert Lester Blackwell was not trying to win a name for himself. He was trying to save the lives of his comrades. It was an act of service such as has been described by the Master of men when He said, "Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends."

ERNEST HYMAN

        Robert Lester Blackwell, of Person County, sacrificed his life in an effort to save his comrades. No officer would have commanded him to take the risk he did, because there was no hope of success. Thus his act was "above and beyond the call of duty."

        Sometimes a soldier is called upon to venture his life in some crisis of battle. This is a call of duty.

        Ernest Hyman was a private in the 120th Infantry. On September 29, 1918, his regiment was charging the Hindenburg line at Bellicourt. It was raining, and smoke and fog filled the air. In the darkness Hyman became lost from his company. A coward would have retreated. But Hyman searched until he found another soldier. These two soldiers advanced together. They found three machine-gun nests, broke them up, and captured four German prisoners. Then they went on till they found their company. Hyman went further. He volunteered to go with a patrol, and went 600 yards into the German lines. For this heroism in battle he was given a Distinguished Service Cross. The account of his bravery was read before his comrades.


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        Over two hundred North Carolina boys did brave deeds like Hyman's. All of them received the Distinguished Service Cross. This cross is an honor given to a man for unusual heroism in battle.

        Like Blackwell and Hyman, all of these men were good soldiers. They were not trying to make names for themselves. They were obeying orders. Their bravery was in the name of service.

        The names of all these men and the story of their bravery are in this little book. While all should be honored alike, perhaps you would like to find the heroes from your own county, and tell the story of their brave deeds on Armistice Day.

EDGAR M. HALYBURTON

        It is a soldier's duty not only to fight in battle, but also to serve his country wherever he may be. This is what Edgar M. Halyburton did.

        Edgar M. Halyburton was born at Taylorsville, North Carolina. He volunteered in the regular army and became a sergeant in the 16th Infantry. This regiment was a part of the 1st Division, and was one of the first regiments to go to France.

        In November, 1917, the Germans raided the American trenches and took Sergeant Halyburton a prisoner. Sergeant Halyburton was carried into Germany and kept as a prisoner of war from November, 1917, till November, 1918. He was in many German prison camps, and in none of them was he well treated. As the war went on other American prisoners of war came to these camps. The Germans tried to break their spirits and make them give valuable information about the American armies. They kept the American prisoners in dirty houses and did not give them enough to eat.

        Many a soldier's spirit would have broken down had it not been for Sergeant Halyburton. He organized the prisoners, and found comfortable places for them to stay in. He saw that all food and clothing due them was fairly divided among all the prisoners. He organized officers and made rules to prevent the Americans from getting discouraged and giving the Germans information about our armies.

        Finally in November, 1918, the Armistice was signed and Sergeant Halyburton and the other prisoners of war were sent back to the American army. There it was learned how he had served his country even while in prison. The Government thanked him publicly for these fine services by giving him a medal called the Distinguished Service Medal. Many generals, colonels and other men of high rank received this medal for the fine work they did in training and leading soldiers. But none of them deserves more credit than Sergeant Halyburton. He was not trying to win a name for himself. He was only doing his duty where he was. His was the spirit of service.


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A DOUGHBOY'S OWN STORY

        We have learned of brave deeds like Blackwell's and Hyman's. We have learned of fine services like Sergeant Halyburton's.

        But there were five million men in the army and navy. What of them? Are they not to be honored, too? They were all in the service. All of them offered their lives. All of them served where duty called them. Thousands of them passed through the same dangers that confronted the heroes about whom we have been studying. Let us learn about these men who called themselves "doughboys."

        There is a story of a great battle as the doughboy saw it. It is told by Corporal James E. Gregory, of Pasquotank County.

        Corporal James E. Gregory was a North Carolina boy. He fought in Belgium, and later at Bellicourt where the Hindenburg line was broken. This is his account of the Battle of the Hindenburg Line on September 29, 1918:

        "At 5:50 a. m., September 29th, our division attacked the Hindenburg line. For four long hours the artillery fire continued from both sides. It looked as if the destruction of the world had begun. I could not hear the sound of a voice. Shells were falling everywhere. Shrapnel was filling the air with its horrible whistle. Wounded men were moaning and groaning on every side. They were pleading for some one to help them. German prisoners were coming over with their hands up. They were yelling 'Kamerad!' Enemy airplanes were whizzing low to the earth and sending showers of bullets on us. My friends everywhere were falling dead and wounded. I hardly knew what was happening. Suddenly the hardest fighting was over. We had taken the great St. Quentin tunnel and the town of Bellicourt. The Hindenburg line had been broken. We spent that night in a German dugout seventy feet underground. The night before Germans had slept there. They thought they would never have to give it up."


        This little story is true. It shows us what every soldier went through in battle. Each soldier had his duty to perform. Each one had to face death. Some were killed, but most of them went through safely. All were filled with the spirit of service.

THE STORY OF "THE PRESIDENT LINCOLN"

        One of the finest transports in our Navy was the President Lincoln. It was commanded by a North Carolinian, Commander Percy W. Foote. His crew was made up of young boys who had joined the Navy for the war. This great ship had made five trips to France and had carried over twenty-five thousand soldiers.


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        May 29, 1918, the President Lincoln left Brest, France. With her were the Susquehana, the Antigone, and the Ryndam. Torpedo boat destroyers escorted them for two days. The destroyers then left the four ships to go alone. The President Lincoln and her sister ships sailed in safety till the morning of May 31st. About nine o'clock there was a loud crash aboard the President Lincoln. She had been struck by a torpedo from a German submarine. Every one knew that the great ship must sink. Her three sister ships had to leave her. Such were the orders. This was to keep the submarine from sinking them, too.

        Commander Foote gave orders to abandon the ship. All the sick and wounded men were placed in boats. All boats were lowered into the water. Then most of the sailors jumped from the sinking ship. But the gun crews remained at their posts. They fired at the submarine until the ship went down. At the last minute they jumped, too.

        The President Lincoln went down with flags flying and left the sailors floating about.

        Then the submarine came back. The Germans were looking for prisoners. They tried to find the commanding officer, but the sailors kept him hid. Finally they captured Lieutenant Isaacs and carried him to Germany. But he escaped before the war was over.

        The sister ships of the President Lincoln sent wireless messages for her aid. Finally the United States destroyer, Warrington, learned what had happened. She was two hundred and fifty miles away. But she started for the scene at once. By skillful sailing the commander of the Warrington sailed two hundred and fifty miles and found the ship-wrecked men by eleven o'clock on the night of the 31st.

        Over six hundred men were on the President Lincoln. Of these only twenty-six lost their lives. One of these was a negro boy. He was Commander Foote's body servant, and lost his life by trying to help Commander Foote get away. Had it not been for the skill and bravery of Commander Foote in controlling his men, many more would have lost their lives. Because of his skill and bravery the United States gave him the Distinguished Service Medal, and the King of Belgium also pinned a medal on this brave sailor.


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BLUE STARS AND GOLD STARS

HENRY VAN DYKE


                         It was my lot of late to travel far
                         Through all America's domain,
                         A willing, gray-haired servitor
                         Bearing the Fiery Cross of righteous war--
                         And everywhere, on mountain, vale and plain,
                         In crowded street and lonely cottage door,
                         I saw the symbol of the bright blue star,
                         Millions of stars. Rejoice, dear land, rejoice
                         That God hath made thee great enough to give
                         Beneath thy starry flag unfurled
                         A gift to all the world--
                         Thy living sons that Liberty might live.


                         But many a boy we hold
                         Dear in our heart of hearts
                         Is missing from the home-returning host.
                         Ah, say not they are lost,
                         For they have found and given their life
                         In sacrificial strife;
                         Their service stars have changed from blue to gold!
                         That sudden rapture took them far away,
                         Yet they are here with us today,
                         Even as the heavenly stars we cannot see
                         Through the bright veil of sunlight
                         Shed their influence still
                         On our vexed life, and promise peace
                         From God to all men of good will.


                         Peace, peace, O great and holy word!
                         Help us, dear God, to guard it with the sword.
                         We want a better world than that of old.
                         Lead us on paths of high endeavor
                         Toiling upward, climbing ever,
                         Ready to suffer for the right,
                         Until we reach at last a loftier height,
                         More worthy to behold
                         Our guiding stars, our hero-stars of gold.


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NORTH CAROLINA MEN AWARDED THE DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS

        Robert Lester Blackwell was the only North Carolinian who won a Congressional Medal of Honor, which is given for service above and beyond the call of duty. He was from Person County. Two hundred North Carolina boys won the Distinguished Service Cross, which is given for great bravery in battle. Eleven won the Distinguished Service Medal, also, which is given for fine work.

        These medals were all given by the United States. France, Great Britain, Belgium, and other nations, also gave medals to many of our soldiers. But we cannot yet learn who they were. As far as possible, the names of these men decorated by the United States, and the stories of their services are told under the head of the counties from which they came. You should learn the heroes in your own county, and the brave deeds they did.

ALAMANCE COUNTY:

        ROBERT P. COOK, sergeant, Company G, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. When his platoon was held up by machine-gun fire during an advance, although suffering from a painful machine-gun bullet wound in the hand, he personally killed the gunner and put the gun out of action, thus permitting the further advance of his platoon.

        Home address, William P. Cook, father, Altamahaw, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

        *WALTER L. FOSTER, Company D, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. Acting as a runner, Private Foster carried frequent messages between his platoon leader and company commander, exposed at all times to heavy enemy fire of artillery and machine guns. While performing this meritorious work he was killed by machine-gun fire.

        * Deceased.


        Home address, Miss Lizzie Foster, sister, Haw River, N. C. (G. O. 21, W. D., 1919.)

        JULIUS A. LANKFORD (Army serial number 1319446), private, Company A, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Saint-Souplet, France, October 17-19, 1918. Being a company runner, he displayed marked bravery, repeatedly crossing heavily shelled areas and exposing himself to machine-gun fire to deliver important messages, enabling his company to maintain adequate liaison.

        Home address, John J. Lankford, father, Swepsonville, N. C. (G. O. 81, W. D., 1919.)

        JOSEPH N. ROBERTSON, first sergeant, Company D, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. With eight other soldiers, comprising the company headquarters detachment, he assisted his company commander in cleaning out enemy dugouts along a canal and capturing 242 prisoners.

        Home address, Mrs. Ozzie Robertson, wife, Graham, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)


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ALEXANDER COUNTY:

        RAYMOND BARNES, private, Company B, 3d Machine Gun Battalion. On July 18, 1918, near Berzy-le-Sec, France, he was severely wounded by a shell, but as soon as he regained consciousness he went forward, rejoined former position in squad, and fought with it until ordered to an aid station by his platoon commander.

        Home address, Green M. Barnes, R. F. D. No. 5, Taylorsville, N. C. (G. O. 109, W. D., 1918.)

        WILSON D. BROOKSHIRE, private, Company G, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. Private Brookshire, with one other soldier, attacked a machine-gun post which was causing much damage. They captured the post, taking prisoner one officer and eight men and put the machine gun out of action.

        Home address, Mrs. Alice E. Brookshire, mother, Taylorsville, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

        ALEXIS M. McLEAN (Army serial number 1317178), private, Company K, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Saint-Souplet, France, October 10, 1918. After one soldier had been killed and another wounded in the attempt he carried a message under heavy fire to company headquarters, bringing up reinforcement which saved his platoon.

        Home address, Mrs. Sarah V. McLain, mother, Hiddenite, N. C. (G. O. 81, W. D., 1919.)

        HERBERT L. MAYS, sergeant, Company G, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. Sergeant Mays, with one other soldier attacked a machine-gun post which was causing much damage. They captured the post, taking prisoner one officer and eight men, and put the gun out of action.

        Home address, Freeman G. Mays, father, Taylorsville, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

ANSON COUNTY:

        JUNIUS DIGGS, private, Company G, 371st Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ardeuil, France, September 30, 1918. After his company had been forced to withdraw from an advanced position under severe machine-gun and artillery fire, this soldier went forward and rescued wounded soldiers, working persistently until all of them had been carried to shelter.

        Home address, Henry Diggs, father, Lilesville, N. C. (G. O. 46, W. D., 1919.)

        PRESTON ALEXANDER McLENDON, passed assistant surgeon, United States Navy, attached to the 5th Regiment, United States Marine Corps. For extraordinary heroism in action near Blanc Mont, France, October 3-4, 1918. During heavy action he continually pushed his dressing station to more advantageous positions. Although in great danger because of a severe shelling, he dressed his patients in an exposed position, using his dugout for the seriously wounded.

        Home address, W. J. McLendon, father, Morven, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)


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ASHE COUNTY:

        ROBERT E. L. KILBY, private, first class, Company K, 9th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near St. Mihiel, France, September 14, 1918. Private Kilby volunteered to go with his company commander to reconnoiter a German trench before a contemplated advance. They encountered a German officer with seven men in the trench. Private Kilby successfully cleaned the trench and saved his captain's life by his coolness and exceptional courage.

        Home address, Mr. Elijah Kilby, father, Grayson, N. C. (G. O. 46, W. D., 1919.)

        WILLIAM M. WALLACE (serial number 1320330), private, first class, Company E, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Mazinghien, France, October 19, 1918. With another soldier Private Wallace volunteered and rescued a wounded comrade from an exposed position in front of the line, after two other men had lost their lives in attempting to do so.

        Home address, Mrs. Mary Wallace, mother, Othello, N. C. (G. O. 50, W. D., 1919.)

BLADEN COUNTY:

        EDWARD LEDWELL, private, Company H, 131st Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bois de Chaume, France, October 9, 1918. Advancing single-handed against a machine gun, Private Lidwell put it out of action, killing its crew of three and preventing an enfilading fire on the company, thus saving many lives.

        Home address, Wallace Brauon, nephew, 24 Seventeenth St., White Oak, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

        *HARVEY L. LEDWELL, sergeant, Company A, 4th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near le Charmel, France, July 26, 1918. Although seriously wounded, he refused aid of his men, who stopped to assist him, ordering them forward and directing their attack until they had passed beyond hearing distance.

        * Deceased.


        Home address, Wallace Brauon, 24 Seventeenth St., White Oak, N. C. (G. O. 32, W. D., 1919.)

        ERNEST S. SAVAGE, first lieutenant, 316th Machine Gun Battalion. For extraordinary heroism in action near Grimacourt, France, November 11, 1918. Although so sick from gas that he could hardly move, and vomiting heavily into his gas mask, he successfully conducted the fire of his machine-gun platoon in the face of heavy shrapnel, gas, and machine-gun fire. He received no medical attention until late in the afternoon after the attack was over.

        Home address, Samuel A. Savage, father, Council, N. C. (G. O. 32, W. D., 1919.)

BRUNSWICK COUNTY:

        FORNEY B. MINTZ, sergeant, Company A, 308th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, September 28, 1918. Sergt. Mintz, in command of a platoon, worked his way through the enemy rear guard and captured five machine guns and an ammunition-carrying party. Although badly wounded when an organized position of the enemy was encountered he made his way back to request reinforcements and brought with him two german prisoners, from whom valuable information was obtained.

        Home address, Sam B. Mintz, father, Mill Branch, N. C. (G. O. 35, W. D., 1919.)


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        *BENJAMIN B. SMITH, private, Company A, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. After being wounded twice in making attacks with his own organization, he joined Australian troops and attacked with them, being wounded a third time before he consented to be evacuated.

        * Deceased.


        Home address, W. M. Smith, father, Ash, N. C. (G. O. 21, W. D. 1919.)

BUNCOMBE COUNTY:

        BRYAN BECKWITH, second lieutenant, Company F, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ypres, Belgium, August 25, 1918. At imminent peril to his life, Lieutenant Beckwith (then a sergeant) and two companious extinguished a fire in an ammunition dump, caused by a bursting shell, thereby preventing the explosion of the dump and saving the lives of a large number of men who were in the vicinity.

        Home address, Robert B. Beckwith, Black Mountain, N. C. (G. O. 44, W. D., 1919.)

        WILLIAM HERREN, first sergeant, Machine Gun Company, 56th Infantry (Army serial number 559453). For extraordinary heroism in action near Ville-Savoye, France, August 7, 1918. He carried guns and ammunition to the front-line platoons through an intense barrage after several carrying details had failed to get through. He then volunteered to stay with the right-flank platoon, which was under heavy fire in an exposed position. During the afternoon he and one other man pushed forward with a captured machine gun and assisted materially in breaking up several hostile counter attacks during the day.

        Next of kin, Mrs. H. L. Herren, mother, 22 Herren Avenue, West Asheville, N. C. (G. O. 64, W. D., 1919.)

        HARVEY S. HESTER, first lieutenant, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Vaux-Andigny, France, October 10, 1918. Although severely wounded in the back by shrapnel, he led his platoon forward, covering a flank of his battalion, which was exposed to heavy enemy fire.

        Home address, Mrs. E. G. Hester, Kenilworth Park, Asheville, N. C. (G. O. 35, W. D., 1919.)

        HAROLD A. HUDSON, sergeant, first class, Company C, 105th Field Signal Battalion. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. Sergeant Hudson and a number of other members of a signal detachment were wounded by shell fire while proceeding through an enemy counter-barrage to the front line, but disregarding his own injuries, this soldier administered first aid to his wounded comrades and then extended a telephone line to the advance message center, and with five men maintained and operated the message center.

        Residence at enlistment: Asheville, N. C. (G. O. 126, November 11, 1919, p. 536.)

        ETHEN S. KOON, second lieutenant, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ypres, Belgium, August 31, 1918. Ignoring his severe wound, suffered in the advance of his platoon against the enemy south of Ypres, he remained with his men until all the wounded had been evacuated and personally directed the reorganization of his position until ordered to the rear by his commanding officer.

        Home address, Mrs. J. N. Koon, mother, P. O. Box 343, Asheville, N. C. (G. O. 44, W. D., 1919.)


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        ROBERT S. PIERCE, private, first class, Company C, 105th Field Signal Battalion. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 27, 1918. After the signal detachment of the 118th Infantry had suffered severe casualties and were no longer able to aid in maintaining lines between the 118th and 117th Regiments, Private Pierce rendered valuable services by keeping up the entire line of communication, working day and night under constant and sweeping artillery fire. Almost uninterrupted service was maintained between the regiments, owing in great part to his untiring energy.

        Home address, Robert F. Pierce, father, Fire Department, Asheville, N. C. (G. O. 46, W. D., 1919.)

        LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS (Army serial number 2384231), first sergeant, Company I, 60th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Clery-le-Petit, France, November 5, 1918. When his company was held up by a machine-gun nest, First Sergeant (then Sergeant) Williams, with two soldiers attacked the nest, killed two gunners and captured eight prisoners. This act made it possible for his company to advance and clear the bridgehead for the crossing of the brigade.

        Home address, Mrs. Addie Williams, mother, Asheville, N. C. (G. O. 71, W. D., 1919.)

BURKE COUNTY:

        ALBERT L. RUST, master engineer, Company D, 105th Engineers. For extraordinary heroism in action at Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. He commanded a platoon of Engineers following the first wave of the infantry for the purpose of clearing a road for the artillery. Under heavy shell and machine-gun fire, he directed the work with exceptional ability, at one time leading his platoon in advance of the Infantry. By organizing covering parties and utilizing two automatic riflemen, who had become separated from their own unit, he kept his platoon intact, capturing 35 prisoners and cleaning out three machine-gun nests in the course of his operations. While making a reconnaissance ahead of his platoon he personally took nine Germans, after wounding their officer. As a result of his skillful leadership and gallant conduct his mission was successfully carried out.

        Home address, David L. Rust, father, Morganton, N. C. (G. O. 145, W. D., 1918.)

CABARRUS COUNTY:

        ALBERT LEE CRANFORD (serial number 1310721), private, Company D, 118th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 27, 1918. After all his comrades had been killed or wounded, and he himself injured by an enemy hand grenade, Private Cranford defended his post single-handed in the face of a German bombing attack until reinforcements arrived. He then continued on duty with his company, refusing to be evacuated until he was severely gassed later.

        Home address, Mrs. Cora Cranford, sister, Concord, N. C. (G. O. 50, W. D., 1919.)

        ERNEST B. GREEN, private, Company D, 118th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 25, 1918. Although stunned and bruised by a shell which burst in his trench, he went to the aid of a comrade outside of the trench and brought him to safety. This was in full view of the enemy and under heavy shelling.

        Home address, Mrs. J. M. Green, 18 South Valley Street, Concord, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)


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        *CARL O. JONES, private, Company E, 118th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Montebrain, France, October 8, 1918. Crawling to the flanks of a German machine-gun nest, he covered the crew with his rifle from a distance of 30 yards and captured 12 of the enemy. This gallant soldier was subsequently killed in action.

        *Deceased.


        Home address, John Jones, Gibson Mill, Concord, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

        JOSEPH H. LAUGHLIN (Army serial No. 56681), private, Company A, 28th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Cantigny, France, May 28-30, 1918. In command of the battalion runners, Private Laughlin volunteered to carry messages through unusually heavy fire. During a very critical period of the fighting he twice went through a machine-gun barrage to the front line to obtain information when no word from that source had been received for a long period.

        Home address, J. F. Laughlin, father, 178 Depot Street, Concord, N. C. (G. O. 98, W. D., 1919.)

        *ALBERT McKAY (Army serial No. 1865857), corporal, Company C, 105th Engineers. For extraordinary heroism in action near Montbrehain, France, October 8, 1918. Corporal McKay, a runner, passed unfalteringly through heavy enemy shell fire to inform platoon leaders of the location of cover from the advance enemy counter-barrage, continuing to expose himself until all were protected, thereby preventing many casualties. As he was returning from this mission he was badly wounded and died shortly afterwards.

        *Deceased.


        Next of kin, Mrs. Belle Branton McKay, Kannapolis, N. C. (G. O. 87, W. D., 1919.)

        THOMAS A. MOORELAND (Army serial number 1312068), private, first class, Company K, 118th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Saint Martin, Revere, France, October 17, 1918. He volunteered to go forward with another soldier to attack a machine-gun emplacement which was holding up a part of our line. Advancing over open ground under heavy fire, these two men destroyed the enemy position, capturing three prisoners and allowing a resumption of the general advance.

        Home address, Sam M. Mooreland, father, 185 Young Street, Concord, N. C. (G. O. 81, W. D., 1919.)

        *VANCE SHANKLE (Army serial No. 1312113), corporal, Company K, 118th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near St. Martin-Riviere, France, October 17, 1918. When the advance of his company was held up, he volunteered to go forward with another soldier, to reduce a machine-gun emplacement. Advancing in front of our lines, these two soldiers attacked the enemy position, destroyed it, and captured three prisoners. Corporal Shankle was killed in action shortly afterwards.

        *Deceased.


        Next of kin, Brooks B. Shankle, brother, Kannapolis, N. C. (G. O. 87, W. D., 1919.)

        ZEBULON B. THORNBURG, first lieutenant, 118th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Montebrain, France, October 8-16, 1918. Although he was severely wounded on October 8 to such an extent that eating was impossible, he remained as second in command until the night of October 16, when he was again wounded during an advance by his company.

        Home address, Mrs. A. B. Thornburg, West Depot Street, Concord, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)


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CALDWELL COUNTY:

        WILLIAM J. McDADE, sergeant, Company B, 117th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Geneve, France, October 8, 1918. While advancing with his platoon on the morning of October 8, Sergeant McDade was seriously wounded in the hip, but insisted upon remaining with his platoon. He was again wounded twice by machine-gun fire, but continued to the objective, where he materially aided in consolidating the position. He was then ordered to the aid station by his commanding officer and was later evacuated to the hospital.

        Home address, Fletcher R. McDade, brother, Lenoir, N. C. (G. O. 46, W. D., 1919.)

        EDWARD L. SPENCER, second lieutenant, 371st Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action north of Ardeuil, France, September 30, 1918. Having been wounded in the leg by machine-gun fire, he nevertheless continued to remain with his platoon, leading it successfully through an intense barrage of machine-gun and artillery fire to its position. He remained on duty with his command until two days later, when his regimental commander ordered him to the rear.

        Home address, J. T. Spencer, father, Lenoir, N. C. (G. O. 46, W. D., 1919.)

CAMDEN COUNTY:

        BURT T. FORBES (Army serial number 1316253), corporal, Company I, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ypres, Belgium, September 1, 1918. While his patrol was acting as a flank guard, with orders not to fire unless absolutely necessary, he detected an enemy patrol of eight men approaching and starting to set up a machine gun. Crawling forward alone, he charged the enemy patrol and, single-handed, killed three Germans and routed the other five.

        Home address, Stephen B. Forbes, father, Old Trap, N. C. (G. O. 81, W. D., 1919.)

        WALTER S. FOREHAND (Army serial No. 1316251), sergeant, Company L, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. Sergeant Forehand showed exceptional bravery and devotion to duty by advancing with another soldier, though separated from his platoon, in the attack by his regiment on September 29, 1918. They found four privates, also lost in the smoke and fog, and with this small party proceeded toward the objective. During their advance they surprised and captured 92 Germans, including several officers, without other aid. They succeeded in getting all the prisoners back to the military police, and then rejoined their platoon.

        Home address, B. S. Forehand, father, South Mills, N. C. (G. O. 78, W. D., 1919.)

CARTERET COUNTY:

        *YOUMAN Z. WEEKS, corporal, Company F, 118th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 30, 1918, and October 8, 1918. Corporal Weeks on the morning of September 30, when two enemy machine guns were making a part of the line untenable, advanced across open ground upon one of the guns, rushed the position alone, captured the gun and five of the enemy, and shot down the sixth, who endeavored to escape. By this gallant act he prevented the enemy from enfilading our position and

        *Deceased.



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thereby saved the lives of many of his comrades. In a later advance, while leading his men in an attack upon an enemy machine-gun nest, he was killed.

        Home address, Mrs. Mary Weeks, North Cedar Point, N. C. (G. O. 133, W. D., 1918.)

CHEROKEE COUNTY:

        MONROE C. HOOPER (Army Serial No. 1316313), corporal, Company I, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Busigny, France, October 10, 1918. Knocked down by the explosion of an explosive bullet beneath his helmet, he regained his feet and led the members of his patrol against a hostile patrol which had been encountered. Though he and his men were outnumbered nearly five to one, he led the advance against the enemy, himself killing seven Germans.

        Home address, Mrs. Hooper, wife, Andrews, N. C. (G. O. 81, W. D., 1919.)

        HENRY G. KELLY, private, Company G, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 20, 1918. Voluntarily advancing alone against a machine-gun nest which was causing heavy casualties in his platoon, he bombed the enemy position, killing five of the crew and capturing the remaining three.

        Home address, U. E. Kelly, grandfather, Andrews, N. C. (G. O. 46, W. D., 1919.)

        ROBERT McDONALD, private, first-class, Company M, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near St. Souplet, France, October 9-10, 1918. He showed exceptional bravery and courage by going forward alone on many occasions to gain information of the enemy. He remained on duty with his company after being wounded until ordered to the rear for treatment.

        Home address, John Moshburn, uncle, Regal, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

        DECATUR F. ROSE, private, Company K, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near St. Souplet, France, October 11, 1918. During an attack by his regiment he was carrying a message from his platoon commander to company headquarters. On the way he met an enemy patrol, and although alone, immediately opened fire upon them, continuing to fire, after being wounded in both legs, until enemy had been completely routed.

        Home address, Mr. Stephen L. Rose, father, Unaka, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

CHOWAN COUNTY:

        JOHN C. BYRUM (serial No. 1312091), first sergeant, Company E, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. Although he was wounded at the very start of the attack, Sergeant Byrum continued with the advance, reorganizing scattered units and leading them back to the line. Later his arm was shot off, but he steadily refused evacuation until loss of blood so weakened him that he was taken to the rear.

        Home address, Mrs. K. E. Byrum, mother, Edenton, N. C. (G. O. 50, W. D., 1919.)

CLEVELAND COUNTY:

        HERBERT O. CHAMPION, private, first-class, sanitary detachment, 105th Engineers. For extraordinary heroism in action July 16, 1918. When an enemy airplane dropped a bomb in the camp of his organization, killing one soldier and wounding seven, including himself, he administered first aid to the other wounded, helped to carry them to the dressing station, and there gave


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further assistance in dressing and evacuating the wounded men, never mentioning his own serious injuries until he knew that all the others had been cared for.

        Home address, Dr. C. C. Champion, father, Mooresboro, N. C. (G. O. 145, W. D., 1919.)

        THOMAS B. GOLD, first lieutenant, Medical Corps, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Busigny, France, October 9, 1918, and Mazinghein, France, October 18-19, 1918. During the attack of October 9, he established his aid post in a roadside shrine up with the front line, where he rendered valuable assistance to the wounded. On another occasion he established alone a post close to the front line, where he again gave treatment until the heavy fire of the enemy forced him to withdraw. During the advance of October 18-19, he established another front-line post under the enemy fire, and thus saved the lives of many of the troops.

        Home address, Mrs. T. B. Gold, wife, Lawndale, N. C. (G. O. 44, W. D., 1919.)

        DENNIS C. TURNER, captain, 30th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Mezy, France, July 15, 1918. Although completely surrounded and his ammunition exhausted, Captain (then lieutenant) Turner refused to surrender. Assembling his platoon of about 18 men, he made a dash for our lines through the enemy's machine-gun and rifle fire, and by taking advantage of all available cover and using grenades and ammunition found on the way, succeeded in joining our troops.

        Home address, Mrs. E. F. Turner, Shelby, N. C. (G. O. 32, W. D., 1919.)

COLUMBUS COUNTY:

        ROBERT F. LEWIS, corporal, Company G, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. His section having been stopped by a concealed machine gun, Corporal Lewis, on his own initiative, crawled forward alone over ground swept by machine-gun fire. Attacking the nest with bombs and firing at it with his rifle, he killed the entire crew, numbering seven, and thereby cleared the way for the further advance of his section.

        Home address, Mrs. Errie A. Lewis, wife, Wananish, N. C. (G. O. 46, W. D., 1919.)

CRAVEN COUNTY:

        JOHN C. DUFFY, second lieutenant, Company F, 53d Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Landersbach, Alsace, October 4, 1918. During an attack by a German raiding party of about 300 men he took command of a post where the five men manning it had been killed or wounded by liquid fire. By his coolness and fearless exposure of himself he was able to hold the post with a small reinforcement. After the raid he removed some 20 grenades which had become dangerously hot, due to the fire, and were about to explode.

        Home address, Mrs. W. C. Blanchard, mother, 28 Pollock St., New Bern, N. C. (G. O. 130, W. D., 1918.)

        RAY F. SHUPP, first lieutenant, 4th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Gland, France, July 21, 1918. After crossing the Marne with the leading platoon of his company, Lieutenant Shupp, with two companions, made a surprise attack on the enemy machine-gun emplacement and succeeded in taking one gun and eight prisoners.

        Residence at appointment: 33 National Avenue, New Bern, N. C. (G. O. 126, W. D. Nov. 11, 1919, p. 547.)


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        *LAWRENCE E. THOMPSON, corporal, Company F, 16th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Boissons, France, July 19, 1918. In order to ascertain the location of a machine-gun which was inflicting heavy losses upon his platoon, he unhesitatingly went forward and was killed in the performance of this courageous duty.

        *Deceased.


        Home address, Ulysses G. Thompson, uncle, Thurman, N. C. (G. O. 15, W. D., 1919.)

CUMBERLAND COUNTY:

        EDGAR BLANCHARD (Army serial No. 1880391), private, Company G, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. He displayed marked personal bravery, capturing single-handed seven Germans whom he came upon in a trench and dugout. While taking the prisoners to the rear he met a wounded soldier, and preferring to return to the firing line, turned the prisoners over to the wounded man and rejoined his squad.

        Home address, Mrs. Addie Blanchard, mother, Fayetteville, N. C. (G. O. 81, W. D., 1919.)

        DANIEL B. BYRD, first lieutenant, Company F, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Escafourt, France, October 10, 1918. Leading a small detachment under heavy fire, while the regiment was making an advance, he encountered stiff resistance which threatened to cut his detachment from the main line. By his utter disregard of the great danger, and the prompt placing of his automatic rifles, he made it possible for his detachment to return to the lines. He was wounded by shrapnel, but he remained with the men until ordered to the rear by his commanding officer.

        Home address, Mr. W. J. Byrd, brother, Fayetteville, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

        OTIS R. DOUGLAS, private, Company C, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. Hearing cries of distress from a disabled tank, he assisted an officer by advancing in the face of terrific machine-gun and shell fire to the spot. Notwithstanding the fact that the tank was subject to point-blank fire of artillery, he succeeded in rescuing the badly wounded tank commander and removing him to a place of safety.

        Home address, Mrs. Otis R. Douglas, wife, R. F. D. No. 1, Fayetteville, N. C. (G. O. 44, W. D., 1919.)

        EDGAR S. W. DRAUGHON, private, Sanitary Detachment, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near St. Quentin, France, September 29 to October 20, 1918. Throughout this period Private Draughon labored unceasingly in evacuating the wounded from the front line to the battalion aid post. On October 19, with complete disregard for his personal safety, he advanced under heavy shell and machine-gun fire beyond the front line, rendered first aid to a wounded officer and assisted him to the rear.

        Home address, Mrs. G. W. Draughon, mother, R. F. D. No. 2, Fayetteville, N. C. (G. O. 35, W. D., 1919.)

        WALTER J. FILLYAW (Army serial No. 2340137), private, Medical Detachment, 4th Infantry, 3rd Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near Cunel, France, October 5, 1918. Having been wounded and ordered to the rear, Private Fillyaw nevertheless continued to administer first-aid treatment


Page 39

to other wounded men under constant shell fire, until he was wounded a second time, when he was evacuated, despite his protests.

        Residence at enlistment: Fayetteville, N. C. (G. O. 126, W. D. Nov. 11, 1919, p. 532.)

        *HENRY H. HALL (Army serial No. 1316674), private, Company L, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Voormezeele, Belgium, August 31, 1918. When the carrier of a Lewis gun crew was killed, he took his place, and the ammunition becoming exhausted, volunteered to go for a new supply under heavy fire. Wounded while on this mission, he opened fire on the enemy with his rifle, engaging a hostile patrol until he was mortally wounded by a second bullet.

        *Deceased.


        Next of kin, Horace W. Hall, father, R. F. D. No. 2, Hope Mills, N. C. (G. O. 87, W. D., 1919.)

        ROBERT J. LAMB, major, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. In command of a company he, with two other men, rushed a machine-gun post which was holding up the advance, killing the German crew. Later, separated from part of his command, owing to a dense smoke screen, he found himself with a few men in front of three German machine-gun nests. Leading the attack, he captured the enemy positions with 25 prisoners.

        Home address, Mrs. James W. Lamb, mother, Fayetteville, N. C. (G. O. 81, W. D., 1919.)

        NOEL E. PATON, sergeant, Company A, 344th Battalion, Tank Corps. For extraordinary heroism in action near Woel, France, September 14, 1918. While on a reconnaissance patrol under heavy machine-gun fire he was seriously wounded and ordered to the rear. Refusing to seek safety, he crawled to the assistance of two comrades whom he had seen disappear under a burst of shrapnel, and with one arm useless, attempted to render aid while he was himself suffering from loss of blood.

        Home address, Mrs. J. L. Allen, mother, Fayetteville, N. C. (G. O. 46, W. D., 1919.)

        GEORGE B. WARD, private, Company D, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. When his company was halted by enemy machine-gun fire, Private Ward rushed the hostile position and killed one gunner with his bayonet. Later in the engagement he came upon 20 of the enemy in a trench. He bayoneted 3 of these and took the others prisoners. He was severely wounded in the action.

        Home address, Thomas Ward, father, Fayetteville, N. C. (G. O. 44, W. D., 1919.)

DARE COUNTY:

        ELWOOD TWIFORD (Army serial No. 1314770), private, Company A, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. Having become separated from the remainder of his squad in a heavy fog and being surrounded by several enemy machine gunners, Private Twiford set up his automatic rifle, and within a few minutes killed or captured all of the enemy near him.

        Home address, W. J. Twiford, father, East Lake, N. C. (G. O. 87, W. D., 1919.) (See also G. O. 98, W. D., 1919, page 18.)


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DAVIDSON COUNTY:

        DUNCAN J. DEVANE, sergeant, Company C, 115th Machine-Gun Battalion. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ypres, Belgium, August 23, 1918. Upon learning that several members of his platoon had been wounded by enemy shell fire, he immediately left his dugout and went to their assistance. After carrying one man to shelter and being knocked down by a bursting shell in so doing, he returned to the shelled area and helped carry the rest of the wounded men to the dressing station 500 yards away across a field which was being heavily bombarded with gas and high-explosive shells.

        Home address, Dr. James D. Devane, father, East Arcadia, N. C. (G. O. 35, W. D., 1919.)

        JOHN W. FAUST, sergeant, Machine-gun Company, 38th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Cunel, France, October 22, 1918. After all the officers of his company had been wounded, Sergeant Faust (then corporal) assumed command, and with great courage and bravery organized a detachment, recapturing two of his machine guns that had fallen to the enemy in a counter-attack in the earlier days.

        Home address, T. W. Faust, father, R. F. D. No. 2, Lexington, N. C.

        WILLIAM J. PARKER (Army serial No. 1319291), sergeant, Company A, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. Severely wounded in the abdomen while in charge of a detail carrying up trench mortar ammunition, he refused to be evacuated, advancing 500 yards, until his left arm was blown off by shell fire. Refusing to be carried on a stretcher, which he said was needed for more severely wounded men, he walked 2 kilometers to the first-aid station.

        Home address, Joseph C. Parker, Lexington, N. C. (G. O. 81, W. D., 1919.)

        ANDREW H. VARNER (Army serial No. 1315405), private, first-class, Company D, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. Seeing that wounded companion had been abandoned by stretcher-bearers because of intense enemy shelling, he took two enemy prisoners, and going out with them for 75 yards through heavy fire, rescued the wounded soldier.

        Home address, Mrs. Jane Varner, mother, Thomasville, N. C. (G. O. 81, W. D., 1919.)

        RAY WILLIAMS (Army serial No. 1319337), bugler, Company A, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Vaux Andigny, France, October 8-12, 1918. Throughout this period Bugler Williams, acting as company runner, showed utter disregard for personal safety in carrying messages under fire. On October 10, when the advance of his company was checked by enemy machine-gun and direct artillery fire, he carried a message of great importance to battalion headquarters and returned with an answer through a hail of bullets and shells. He continued to carry messages until he dropped from sheer exhaustion, and even then begged to be permitted to resume his duties.

        Home address, M. T. Williams, father, Lexington, N. C. (G. O. 87, W. D., 1919.) (See also G. O. 98, W. D., 1919, page 38.)

DAVIE COUNTY:

        *CHARLES JORDAN (Army serial No. 1316133), private, Company H, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. He repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire to save his

        *Deceased.



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comrades, going forward in advance of our lines to attack machine-gun nests. After reducing one enemy nest with rifle grenades, he proceeded to attack another, and while doing so was killed by enemy snipers.

        Next of kin, George W. Jordan, father, Coleemee, N. C. (G. O. 87, W. D., 1919.)

DUPLIN COUNTY:

        ISHAM R. WILLIAMS, second lieutenant, 7th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Fossey, France, July 21, 1918. He led a patrol across the Marne River under intense machine-gun fire, and when his boat was sunk twice swam the river to correct the fire of his covering detachment and to bring his patrol to safety after their mission had been accomplished.

        Home address, Mary Lyde Hicks Williams, mother, Faison, N. C. (G. O. 44, W. D., 1919.)

DURHAM COUNTY:

        THOMAS P. BANE (Army serial No. 1307266), corporal, Company C., 117th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Busigny, France, October 9, 1918. Corporal Bane, while leading his squad in the advance with his company, was wounded by a machine-gun bullet in the head. Despite his wound he continued in the advance until the objective was reached and the position consolidated. Corporal Bane on the day previous, in company with two comrades, rushed a nearby machine-gun nest, killing five of the enemy and capturing the remainder.

        Home address, Daniel D. Bane, father, 203 Elm Street, Durham, N. C. (G. O. 78, W. D., 1919.)

        OLLIE POPE, private, Company C, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action between St. Quentin and Cambrai, France, October 9, 1918. He was wounded in action between St. Quentin and Cambrai, France, and after having his wounds dressed, he was unable to locate his company. He returned, however, to the front line and fought throughout the day, locating and returning to his own organization after dark.

        Home address, Mrs. Martha M. Pope, 1101 Worth Street, Durham, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

        LAWRENCE STANFIELD, color sergeant, Headquarters Company, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 28, 1918. While attached to the regimental intelligence service he was severely gassed, but after receiving first-aid treatment he insisted on returning to duty. Gassed a second time and relieved for a short period, he personally made a search for wounded men, and finding a large number, went to the aid station and brought stretcher-bearers. He continued this work until he was blinded by the effects of the gas.

        Home address, R. H. Stanfield, father, 705 East Main Street, Durham, N. C. (G. O. 133, W. D., 1918.)

        HUBERT O. TEER, first lieutenant, Company L, 371st Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action at Ardeuil, France, September 29, 1917. Severely wounded in the back about 11 a. m., Lieutenant Teer continued to command his platoon until 4 p. m., when he was forced to withdraw from action on account of complete exhaustion.

        Home address, Mr. Nello L. Teer, brother, Durham, N. C. (G. O. 21, W. D., 1919.)


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EDGECOMBE COUNTY:

        SAMUEL R. BROWN, sergeant, Company F, 322d Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action November 9, 1918, near Moranville and Grimacourt, France. After having been wounded in the afternoon of November 9, he had this wound dressed and returned to his platoon through very heavy enemy artillery and machine-gun fire. When his platoon was relieved he returned to the former position through enemy artillery fire to the rescue of a wounded man and assisted him to the rear.

        Home address, J. F. Brown, father, Macclesfield, N. C. (G. O. 32, W. D., 1919.)

        THOMAS W. CARLISLE (Army serial No. 1315229), sergeant, Company D, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918, and near St. Souplet, France, October 12, 1918. He volunteered with two comrades and went in advance of our lines, under heavy machine-gun fire, and rescued a wounded soldier. Later, when his platoon had been reduced to four men, he inspired them by his personal courage to hold their position until reinforcements arrived.

        Home address, Mrs. Bessie C. Cobb, sister, Tarboro, N. C. (G. O. 81, W. D., 1919.)

        THOMAS H. ROYSTER, first lieutenant, Medical Corps, attached to 30th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Crexancy, France, July 15, 1918. When casualties during the offensive of July 15, 1918, had become so great that it was necessary to work in the open, Lieutenant Royster exposed himself to the severe fire for ten hours, dressing and caring for the wounded.

        Residence at appointment: Tarboro, N. C. (G. O. 126, W. D., Nov. 11, 1918, page 546.)

        GARLAND SPAIN, corporal, Company E, 322d Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Moranville, France, November 9, 1918. Leading his squad against six enemy machine guns, during which time he was hit twice from the exacting fire therefrom, he drove the enemy from the stronghold, making possible the further advance of his company.

        Home address, Mrs. Mattie Hines, sister, Rocky Mount, N. C. (G. O. 32, W. D., 1919.)

        CHARLES F. STEPHENSON (Army serial No. 1329349), corporal, Company D, 105th Engineers. For extraordinary heroism in action at Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. As Corporal Stephenson and his squad were engaged in planking over a shell hole, they were fired on from the side. Locating the course of the fire by a flash, he attacked the enemy position with his rifle, killing one German, taking two prisoners, and clearing the adjacent shell holes. His quick initiative and bravery saved the lives of his men and prevented an interruption of their work.

        Home address, Mrs. Della Dupree Stephenson, wife, Rocky Mount, N. C. (G. O. 98, W. D., 1919.)

FORSYTH COUNTY:

        MACK C. BYRD, first sergeant, Company D, 2d Engineers. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bois de Belleau, France, June 3, 1918. Although badly wounded and suffering intense pain, Sergeant Byrd refused evacuation, remaining and assisting his commanding officer throughout the operations.

        Home address, Frank W. Byrd, brother, Zeigler Street, Winston-Salem, N. C. (G. O. 23, W. D., 1919.)


Page 43

        JAMES O. JORDAN, private, Company H, 117th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Busigny, France, October 9, 1918. When his platoon was subjected to heavy machine-gun fire from the front and flanks, Private Jordan courageously operated his automatic rifle from an exposed position with such good effect that fire superiority was maintained until reinforcements arrived.

        Home address, Mrs. Clara Jordan, wife, 303 Devonshire Street, Winston-Salem, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

        MACK O. OLIVER, sergeant, Company H, 28th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action west of the Meuse, France, October 11, 1918. After having been severely wounded by shrapnel, he refused to leave the lines, realizing the urgent need of men. After being relieved, he walked to the dressing station, despite his weakness from loss of blood and his painful suffering from the wound.

        Home address, Mack Oliver, father, Second and Shady Ave., Winston-Salem, N. C. (G. O. 44, W. D., 1919.)

        *HERBERT S. TURRENTINE, private, Company C, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ypres, Belgium, August 31, 1918. After his platoon sergeant and a corporal had been shot while firing an automatic rifle, he ran forward across an open space and picked up the gun, but was instantly killed by sniper fire while attempting to get the automatic gun back into action.

        *Deceased.


        Home address, Mrs. J. P. Shaw, sister, R. F. D. No. 3, Winston-Salem, N. C. (G. O. 44, W. D., 1919.)

        DONALD L. WAGNER, sergeant, 314th Ambulance Company, 304th Sanitary Train. For extraordinary heroism in action near Montfaucon, France, September 29, 1918. He heard a cry for help while in a dugout having his own wounds dressed. Although it was during a particularly heavy shell fire, he immediately went outside and carried the wounded man to shelter. Later that day, when the dressing station caught fire, he made his way into the burning dressing station under heavy shell fire and secured surgical equipment necessary to save a patient's life.

        Home address, John L. Wagner, father, 2514 North Liberty Street, Winston-Salem, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

FRANKLIN COUNTY:

        DALTON SMITH (Army serial No. 1319720), private, Company B, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Mazinghein, France, October 19, 1918. Acting as a scout, Private Smith fearlessly advanced ahead of his company under heavy fire and sent back all obtainable information to the company commander. While standing erect in the open and directing effective rifle fire at the retreating enemy, he was seriously wounded.

        Home address, Dalton Smith, father, Louisburg, N. C.

GASTON COUNTY:

        *BEN F. DIXON, captain, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action, near Vaux, Andigny, France, September 29-1918. He was severely wounded during the early part of the operations against the Hindenburg line; his company having only one officer he remained on duty. Shortly afterwards he received a second wound and again refused to leave his men. When he

        *Deceased.



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saw that the front waves of his company were getting into a barrage, he at once went forward to stop them, and while doing so he was killed.

        Home address, Mrs. B. F. Dixon, Sr., Gastonia, N. C. (G. O. 133, W. D., 1918.)

        JAMES W. HOLLAND, sergeant, first-class, Company D, 105th Engineers. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. While suffering from severe wounds, and still subjected to intense artillery fire, Sergeant Holland directed the evacuation of his platoon commander, and fully instructed his junior sergeant before he would allow himself to be evacuated.

        Home address, Mrs. James C. Holland, mother, Gastonia, N. C. (G. O. 21, W. D., 1919.)

GATES COUNTY:

        *WALLACE GREEN, sergeant, Company M, 6th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action at Frapelle, France, August 17, 1918. He unhesitatingly and with great coolness and courage went forward under a heavy enemy barrage to destroy wire entanglements and continued this hazardous work until killed.

        *Deceased.


        Home address, Mrs. Elizabeth Green, mother, Eure, N. C. (G. O. 15, W. D., 1919.)

GRANVILLE COUNTY:

        JAMES M. ELLINGTON, first lieutenant, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. Severely wounded in an attack, he refused to stop for first-aid, leading his men forward under heavy fire. When, after several hours fighting, he was ordered to the rear by his battalion commander, he returned to the front line after having his wound dressed, directing the work of reorganizing his command and consolidating the position that had been won.

        Home address, James M. Ellington, father, Oxford, N. C. (G. O. 81, W. D., 1919.)

        GRAHAM W. HARRIS, sergeant, Machine-gun Company, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. Becoming separated from his platoon in the dense smoke and fog with five other soldiers, Sergeant Harris kept his men together and continued the advance under heavy artillery and machine-gun fire. Upon reaching the objective, he made a personal reconnaissance 600 yards to the front, captured several prisoners, and assisting in breaking up three machine-gun nests. He remained in this advanced position until he was ordered back.

        Home address, Mrs. R. W. Harris, mother, Oxford, N. C. (G. O. 44, W. D., 1919.)

        *PAUL B. JENKINS, sergeant, Headquarters Company, 315th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Gibercy, France, November 11, 1918. While installing telephone line his regiment started an attack. The enemy responded with a terrific barrage, and before the communication was completed Sergeant Jenkins was in the midst of a heavy encounter. Bravely he remained at his post, endeavoring to establish telephone service, but was instantly killed by shell fire.

        *Deceased.


        Home address, Mrs. Eunice G. Strother, sister, Granville County, Franklinton, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)


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        JOHN B. MAYES, JR., captain, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. Captain Mayes, with eight other soldiers, comprising his company headquarters' detachment, cleaned out enemy dugouts along the banks of a canal, capturing 242 prisoners.

        Home address, John B. Mayes, father, Stem, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

        WILLIAM H. POWELL, sergeant, Machine-gun Company, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. Sergeant Powell, then a private, took charge of four other soldiers who had become separated from their platoon and led them forward toward the objective. Attacking a machine-gun nest, they captured seven prisoners and a Maxim gun, which they immediately put into action and fired 2,000 rounds at the enemy. They then continued to advance under heavy artillery and machine-gun fire.

        Home address, J. B. Powell, father, Oxford, N. C. (G. O. 44, W. D., 1919.)

GUILFORD COUNTY:

        ROBERT L. CAMPBELL, first lieutenant, 368th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Binarville, France, September 27, 1918. In the afternoon of September 27, Lieutenant Campbell saw a runner fall wounded in the middle of a field swept by heavy machine-gun fire. At imminent peril to his own life, and in full view of the enemy, he crossed the field and carried the wounded soldier to shelter.

        Home address, Mrs. Alice B. Campbell, wife, 913 Lindsay Street, Greensboro, N. C. (G. O. 27, W. D. 1919.)

        DELBERT FARRINGTON (Army serial No. 317910), sergeant, Company M, 312th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action at Novitskaya, Siberia, July 2, 1919. After his platoon commander was severely wounded, he assumed command of the platoon and led it in such a skillful manner as to gain superiority of fire and drive the enemy from his position without further loss to the platoon.

        Residence at enlistment: Box 52, Greensboro, N. C. (G. O. 133, W. D. Dec. 20, 1919.)

        HARVEY M. LEDWELL, sergeant, Company A, 4th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near le Charmel, France, July 26, 1918. Although very seriously wounded, he refused aid of his men, who stopped to assist him, ordering them forward and directing their attack until they had passed beyond hearing distance.

        Emergency address: Wallace H. Branon, nephew, 24 Seventeenth St., White Oak, N. C. Residence at enlistment: Greensboro, N. C. (G. O. 125, W. D. Nov. 11, 1919, page 539.)

        ERNEST MORGAN, private, Company L, 118th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Vaux-Andigny, France, October 12, 1918. While his company was consolidating its position, he crept into a shell hole 50 yards from the enemy's lines. He remained there throughout the day without food or water and sniped at and killed ten of the enemy. His deadly aim kept down the observation from the German lines and enabled his company to carry on the work of consolidation.

        Home address, C. A. Morgan, father, 500 Wise Street, High Point, N. C. (G. O. 133, W. D., 1918.)


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HALIFAX COUNTY:

        WILLIE HIGSON, corporal, Company C, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. He showed extraordinary heroism and courage in leading his men under heavy shrapnel and enfilading machine-gun fire during the attack on the Hindenburg line. During a temporary halt he acted as runner through this fire, and attempted to return after being severely wounded.

        Home address, Mrs. W. B. Higson, mother, Rosemary, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

        *ERNEST HYMAN, private, Machine-gun Company, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. Becoming separated from his organization in the smoke and fog, Private Hyman joined another soldier and was instrumental in breaking up three machine-gun nests and capturing four prisoners. After reaching the objective, he volunteered and accompanied a reconnaissance patrol 600 yards beyond the line to the enemy. He has since been killed in action.

        *Deceased


        Home address, Mrs. J. E. Hyman, mother, Route No. 1, Palmyra, N. C.

HARNETT COUNTY:

        OLLIE R. LINK, cook, Company M, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near St. Souplet, France, October 9-10, 1918. Hearing that the casualties in his company were very heavy, he left his place in the kitchen and joined his comrades on the front line. From there he advanced alone a distance of 200 yards and located two machine-gun nests, the journey being done in the face of heavy enemy fire.

        Home address, Mr. Jesse B. Link, father, Buies Creek, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

HAYWOOD COUNTY:

        JOHN CARVER (Army serial number 1316155), corporal, Company H, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. With another soldier he attacked and demolished two enemy machine-gun posts 200 yards in advance of our lines. He then stood guard at the entrance of a dugout while the other soldier entered it and brought out 75 Germans and 3 officers, who were taken back to the line as prisoners.

        Home address, Mrs. Mary Carver, mother, Plott, N. C. (G. O. 81, W. D., 1919.)

HENDERSON COUNTY:

        ALEXANDER HOLLINGSWORTH, corporal, Company B, 354th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Remonville, France, November 1, 1918. He led his combat group against a machine-gun position through an intense machine-gun and artillery fire, and although severely wounded, took part in the capture of the machine gun and crew. He refused to be evacuated until he had reported to his company commander.

        Home address, Isaac A. Hollingsworth, father, Flat Rock, N. C. (G. O. 44, W. D., 1919.)

        EDGAR E. McDOWELL, private, Company F, 118th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Monterehain, France, October 8, 1918. When the second wave of his company was confronted by two enemy machinegun posts, which had been passed over by the first wave, Private McDowell,


Page 47

from a prone position, sniped at these posts and then rushed one of them. In so doing he was wounded in the wrist, but he continued on and succeeded in killing two Germans and capturing four others. The other posts, containing twenty of the enemy, surrendered shortly afterwards.

        Residence at enlistment: Hendersonville, N. C. (G. O. 126, W. D. Nov. 11, 1919, page 540.)

        GEORGE BLAIN WARD, sergeant, Company A, 118th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Brancourt, France, October 8, 1918. Taking command of the company after all officers had become casualties, he reorganized it and led it under hostile shelling and withering machine-gun fire to its objective. He remained in command until painfully wounded on the following day.

        Home address, Mrs. E. W. Ward, mother, Brickton, N. C. (G. O. 35, W. D., 1919.)

IREDELL COUNTY:

        *SAMUEL C. HART, private, first-class, Company G, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. After having been seriously wounded in the arm, which caused much pain and loss of blood, he continued to advance, carrying a Lewis gun, and pouring an effective fire into the ranks of the enemy until he was killed in the attack.

        *Deceased.


        Home address, Samuel B. Hart, father, R. F. D. No. 3, Mooresville, N. C. (G. O. 46, W. D., 1919.)

        JULIAN K. MORRISON, second lieutenant, Tank Corps. For extraordinary heroism in action in the Bois Quart de Reserve, France, September 12, 1918. Preceding his tanks on foot, Lieutenant Morrison captured a machine-gun nest. Though he was twice wounded, he continued in action for two days thereafter.

        For the following acts of extraordinary heroism in action near Very, France, September 28, 1918, Lieutenant Morrison is awarded an oak-leaf cluster, to be worn with the distinguished service cross. During the attack on Charpentry and the Bois de Montrebeau, he led a platoon of five tanks, directing his tanks on foot, 400 yards in advance of the infantry, under intense fire. Three of his tanks were put out of action by artillery fire, but he continued in action with the remaining two until dark, when he directed the work of rescuing the crews.

        Home address, Mr. A. J. Salley, 247 East Broad Street, Statesville, N. C. (G. O. 46, W. D., 1919.)

JACKSON COUNTY:

        JULIUS JESSE BRYSON (Army serial No. 1310635), first lieutenant, Company D, 118th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 27, 1918. Although wounded very seriously in the knee by Shrapnel, Sergeant Bryson remained in charge of his platoon for more than 24 hours, during a critical period of the operations. Due to his excellent example of courage, leadership, and skill in handling them, his platoon successfully repelled a number of enemy attacks during this period of time.

        Home address, S. J. Bryson, father, Webster, N. C. (G. O. 64, W. D., 1919.)

        *WALTER WALDROOP (Army serial No. 55383), private, first-class, Machine-gun Company, 26th Infantry, 1st Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near Verdun, France, October 9, 1918. Private Waldroop, with an officer and six other soldiers, drove off a violent assault of 50 of the enemy

        *Deceased.



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after a terrific pistol and grenade fight, thereby holding Hill 269, which was of the utmost tactical importance. During the fighting Private Waldroop was killed.

        Emergency address: Mrs. E. H. Waldroop, mother, Sylva, N. C. Residence at Enlistment: Sylva, N. C. (G. O. 126, W. D. Nov. 11, 1919, page 550.)

JOHNSTON COUNTY:

        *WILLIAM C. BARBOUR, private, first-class, Company C, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Busigny, France, October 9, 1918. During the operations near Busigny on October 9, he, with one other soldier, voluntarily left his place of comparative safety and advanced into the open in the face of close-range machine-gun fire to rescue a severely wounded comrade. He received a severe wound while engaged in this self-appointed task, from which he later died.

        *Deceased.


        Home address, Mrs. Mandy Barbour, mother, R. F. D. No. 1, Smithfield, N. C. (G. O. 44, W. D., 1919.)

        ELIJAH A. CAPPS, private, Company G, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. In the face of heavy machine-gun fire, Private Capps, with two other soldiers, attacked and put out of action an enemy machine-gun post, capturing a German officer and three soldiers.

        Home address, Mrs. Lillie Capps, wife, R. No. 2, Princeton, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

        DEWITT HARDISON, private, first-class, Company G, 105th Field Signal Battalion. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. Being a member of a detail to establish communication with the front line, Private Hardison was caught in an enemy barrage, during which his detail suffered many casualties. Although badly gassed, he continued to work for the entire day, always exposed to heavy artillery fire, after which he assisted in the removal of the wounded.

        Home address, Mrs. A. H. Hardison, Kenly, N. C. (G. O. 21, W. D., 1919.)

        CARLTON STEPHENSON, corporal, Company B, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Catillon, France, October 18, 1918. Severely wounded, he remained with his automatic rifle section in an exposed position, covering the withdrawal of his company. Although almost surrounded, he inflicted severe losses on the enemy and held his position throughout the day.

        Home address, Mrs. Bidie A. Stephenson, mother, Clayton, N. C. (G. O. 35, W. D., 1919.)

LEE COUNTY:

        ALVIN O. BRIDGES, private, first-class, Company D, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. With eight other soldiers, comprising the company headquarters detachment, he assisted his company commander in cleaning out enemy dugouts along a canal and capturing 242 prisoners.

        Home address, Mrs. R. D. Bridges, mother, R. No. 3, Jonesboro, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)


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LENOIR COUNTY:

        PAUL G. HAWKINS (Army serial No. 1317111), sergeant, Machine-gun Company, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 28-29, 1918. As a platoon runner he showed marked personal bravery, repeatedly carrying important messages over shell-swept areas and under heavy machine-gun fire, sometimes for a distance of two miles. He remained constantly on duty for two days, and when his section leader became separated from his section, took command and led it with success.

        Home address, John O. Hawkins, father, Kinston, N. C. (G. O. 81, W. D., 1919.)

        *BURNWELL C. JACKSON, private, Company F, 16th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Soissons, France, July 19, 1918. He, alone, captured a machine gun, killed two of the crew, and took the remaining three prisoners. Later in the same day he was killed while making a similar attempt.

        *Deceased.


        Home address, Jesse L. Jackson, brother, R. F. D. No. 4, Kinston, N. C. (G. O. 15, W. D., 1919.)

MACON COUNTY:

        WALTER EUGENE FURR, private, 82d Company, 6th Regiment, United States Marine Corps. For extraordinary heroism in action near Vierzy, France, July 19, 1918. Unaided Private Furr crept forward in advance of his line, searched an underground tunnel, captured five Germans, and brought them back through heavy machine-gun and shell fire.

        Residence at enlistment: Franklin, N. C. (G. O. 126, W. D. Nov. 11, 1919, page 533.)

        THOMAS M. MOSS, private, Company I, 324th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action in Bois de Manheaulles, France, November 9, 1918. With utter disregard for personal safety, he went forward under intense machinegun fire to rescue an officer who had been mortally wounded.

        Home address, William W. Moss, U. S. Postoffice, Gneiss, N. C. (G. O. 32, W. D., 1919.)

MADISON COUNTY:

        JOSEPH L. BRADLEY (Army serial No. 40617), private, first-class, Company L, 9th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Medeah Ferme, France, October 8, 1918. Without regard for his own safety, Private Bradley worked unceasingly as a stretcher-bearer, caring for the wounded of other companies, as well as those of his own, and inspiring others to greater efforts by his example of courage and endurance.

        Home address, Henry L. Bradley, father, R. F. D. No. 2, Marshall, N. C. (G. O. 78, W. D., 1919.)

        WILLIAM H. SPRINGS (Army serial No. 42618), sergeant, Company E, 16th Infantry, 1st Division. For extraordinary heroism in action south of Soissons, France, July 18, 1918. After his platoon commander had been wounded, Sergeant Springs took command, reorganized, and led the platoon forward through heavy fire to all its objectives, in which attack he was severely through heavy fire to all its objectives, in which attack he was severely wounded. He also rendered gallant service before Montdidier and St. Mihiel, during both of which operations he was wounded.

        Residence at enlistment: Route No. 3, Marshall, N. C. (G. O. 35, W. D. June 15, 1920.)


Page 50

MARTIN COUNTY:

        HUGH B. MARTIN (Army serial No. 1317775), corporal, Machine-gun Company, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Busigny, France, October 10, 1918. When a battalion of infantry was held up by heavy machine-gun fire, he rushed his section forward to a position 300 yards in advance of our front lines, engaged and silenced the enemy, and allowed a renewal of the advance. He displayed marked personal bravery under terrific enemy fire.

        Home address, Jebtha B. Martin, brother, Williamston, N. C. (G. O. 81, W. D., 1919.)

        CHARLES R. MOBLEY, sergeant, Company F, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ypres, Belgium, August 25, 1918. At imminent peril to his own life, Sergeant Mobley and two companions extinguished a fire in an ammunition dump caused by a bursting shell, thereby preventing the explosion of the dump and saving the lives of a large number of men who were in the vicinity.

        Home address, Mrs. Mary J. Mobley, mother, Williamston, N. C. (G. O. 32, W. D., 1919.)

MECKLENBURG COUNTY:

        THOMAS L. ALEXANDER, first lieutenant, 327th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Chatel-Chehery, France, October 8, 1918. Leading the first attack wave, he was painfully wounded in the mouth. He continued on through the heavy fire for a distance of 10,000 yards until his objective was reached. Organizing his position and consolidating his men, he remained in command, though very weak from exhaustion and loss of blood, refusing treatment until relieved.

        Home address, F. R. Alexander, brother, Piedmont Building, Charlotte, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

        JOHN W. BERRYHILL, private, first-class, Company D, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. With eight other soldiers, comprising the company headquarters detachment, he assisted his company commander in cleaning out enemy dugouts along a canal and capturing 242 prisoners.

        Home address, Mrs. John W. Berryhill, wife, Charlotte, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

        CARLISLE C. COTHRAN (Army serial No. 545136), sergeant Medical Detachment, 30th Infantry, 3rd Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near Crezancy, France, July 15, 1918. Sergeant Cothran, though severely injured in one foot early in the morning, persevered in the work of rendering first aid and assistance to the wounded exposed to heavy shell fire, until it became necessary for him to be evacuated later in the afternoon.

        Residence at enlistment: Huntersville, N. C. (G. O. 16, W. D. March 20, 1920.)

        WILLIAM CURLEE, corporal, Company F, 9th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Medeah Farm, France, October 3, 1918. Corporal Curlee, together with four men, charged a machine-gun nest containing three machine guns and captured the 3 guns and 20 prisoners.

        Home address, Miss Jodie Curlee, sister, Charlotte, N. C. (G. O. 21, W. D., 1919.)


Page 51

        GUY R. HINSON, sergeant, first class, Company F, 105th Engineers. For extraordinary heroism in action August 27, 1918. He was in charge of a platoon, delivering a highly concentrated gas-cloud attack against the enemy, when the cloud unexpectedly flared back. After leading his men to a place of safety, this soldier went back into the cloud four times at imminent peril to his own life, collecting and rescuing others who had been overcome. Conducting his platoon through heavy machine-gun fire, he put them in charge of another sergeant with instructions to resume their mission, while he again returned to search for gassed men, and found all but two. His excellent leadership and unusual courage prevented many casualties, and at the same time effected the completion of an important mission.

        Home address, Mrs. Dela Hinson, 610 East 7th Street, Charlotte, N. C. (G. O. 145, W. D., 1918.)

        LOUIS E. JOHNSTON, corporal, Machine Gun Company, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Mazinghein, France, October 18-19, 1918. When his platoon became separated from the battalion to which it was attached, Corporal Johnston proceeded under heavy fire along a road with which he was unfamiliar and established liaison with his battalion.

        Home address, J. A. Johnston, father, Davidson, N. C. (G. O. 35, W. D., 1919.)

        BENJAMIN A. POORE, brigadier general, 7th Infantry Brigade. For repeated acts of extraordinary heroism at Bois de Septsarges, France, September 27, and at Bois du Fays, France, October 11, 1918. At Bois de Septsarger, on September 27, General Poore personally reformed his disorganized troops, who were falling back through lack of command, and because of severe casualties. Under heavy fire, he led them to the lines, and presented an unbroken front to the enemy. Again on October 11, in the region of Bois de Fays, he gathered together troops who were taking refuge from hostile fire and turned them over to the support commander.

        Home address, Mrs. B. A. Poore, 126 East Morehead St., Charlotte, N. C. (G. O. 44, W. D., 1919.)

        *DANIEL C. POPLIN, private, Company H, 4th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Roncheres, France, July 29, 1918. He repeatedly carried messages between his own and another company across an open field swept by heavy machine-gun and sniper fire and was killed while on one of these missions.

        *Deceased.


        Home address, Mrs. Mary Poplin, 920 North Caldwell St., Charlotte, N. C. (G. O. 32, W. D., 1919.)

        *JOHN O. RANSON, first lieutenant, 371st Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ardeuil, France, September 29, 1918. When his company was held up by an enemy machine-gun nest, Lieutenant Ranson volunteered and led his platoon in an attack on the position, and while attempting to carry out his mission was killed.

        *Deceased.


        Home address, Mrs. John O. Ranson, wife, Charlotte, N. C. (G. O. 20, W. D., 1919.)

        JOHN F. WILLIAMS, JR., first lieutenant, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ypres, Belgium, August 2, 1918. He volunteered to destroy an enemy pillbox which had caused many casualties in his battalion. With much skill and daring he led a daylight patrol, under heavy shell and


Page 52

machine-gun fire, rushed the pillbox, killed or wounded the occupants, and accomplished his mission.

        Home address, John F. Williams, Sr., father, 201 East Liberty Street, Charlotte, N. C. (G. O. 143, W. D., 1919.)

NEW HANOVER COUNTY:

        BEN G. DAVIS, private, Company C, 115th Machine Gun Battalion. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ypres, Belgium, August 23, 1918. When several members of his platoon were severely wounded by shell fire, Private Davis, though himself severely wounded, went through the bombardment to a dugout and procured assistance for his comrades, guiding a rescuing party to their assistance.

        Home address, Mrs. Marie Davis, mother, 512 Nunn Street, Wilmington, N. C. (G. O. 35, W. D., 1919.)

        *JAMES C. LODER, second lieutenant, 26th Infantry. On July 18, 1918, he gallantly inspired his platoon to three vigorous and successful advances against machine-gun fire near Soissons, France, in the last of which he was killed.

        *Deceased.


        Home address, Mrs. James C. Loder, P. O. Box 422, Wilmington, N. C. (G. O. 132, W. D., 1918.)

        *DAVID WORTH LORING, first lieutenant, 115th Machine Gun Battalion. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ypres, Belgium, August 23, 1918. When his gun positions were rendered untenable by shell fire and his men ordered to seek shelter in dugouts, Lieutenant Loring left a place of safety for the purpose of seeing that all of his men were under cover and was mortally wounded by a shell, dying on his way to the hospital.

        *Deceased.


        Home address, Mrs. Viola Shaw Loring, wife, 117 South 17th Street, Wilmington, N. C. (G. O. 32, W. D., 1919.)

        *JOSEPH J. LOUGHLIN, captain, 322d Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Moranville, France, November 9, 1918. At the sacrifice of his own life, he went forward through heavy machine-gun fire to locate a nest of machine guns which was holding up the advance of the regiment. He located the machine guns so that 1-pounders could silence them, but was killed by the enemy machine-gun fire.

        *Deceased.


        Home address, Mrs. Eleanor K. Loughlin, wife, 513 South Front St., Wilmington, N. C. (G. O. 32, W. D., 1919.)

        HARMON C. RORISON, first lieutenant, Aviation Section, 22d Aero Squadron, Air Service. For extraordinary heroism in action near Beaumont, France, November 3, 1918. While on a bombing mission with 5 other pilots, his patrol was attacked by 18 enemy planes (type Fokker). Three of his comrades were immediately shot down, but he continued in the fight for 30 minutes, and destroyed two Fokkers which were attacking the other two members of his patrol. With his plane badly damaged and himself wounded, he succeeded in shooting down another Fokker just before one of his guns was put out of action. By skillful maneuvering he shook off the rest of the Fokkers and reached his lines, 15 miles away, in safety.

        Home address, Charles C. Chadbourn, uncle, Wilmington, N. C. (G. O. 46, W. D., 1919.)

        SILAS V. SNEEDEN, private, Company C, 115th Machine Gun Battalion. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ypres, Belgium, August 23, 1918. Upon learning that his platoon commander and several comrades had been


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wounded by heavy shell fire, he voluntarily left his dugout and went to their assistance, helping to carry them 500 yards to the dressing station across an open field heavily bombarded with gas and high-explosive shells.

        Home address, Thomas V. Sneeden, father, Sea Gate, N. C. (G. O. 35, W. D., 1919.)

        SAMUEL F. YOPP, JR., sergeant, Medical Corps, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Hargicourt, France, September 28, 1918. While directing the evacuation of the wounded he was severely gassed, but refused to be evacuated and continued in charge of the dressing station to which he had been assigned. He displayed marked fortitude and personal bravery, working constantly to help the wounded.

        Home address, Mrs. Samuel F. Yopp, Sr., mother, 202 South Ninth Street, Wilmington, N. C. (G. O. 81, W. D., 1919.)

NORTHAMPTON COUNTY:

        CHARLES W. PARKER, second lieutenant, Company L, 371st Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ardeuil, France, September 29-October 1, 1918. Severely wounded in the foot September 29, Lieutenant Parker remained on duty and ably commanded his platoon until October 1, 1918.

        Home address, Mrs. Jamie J. Parker, Woodland, N. C. (G. O. 21, W. D., 1919.)

ORANGE COUNTY:

        *JOSEPH H. JOHNSTON, first lieutenant, 322d Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action at Beulay, France, October 15, 1918. Lieutenant Johnston led a daylight patrol behind the German front line for the purpose of securing information as to the reported retreat of the enemy. Discovering an enemy machine gun, he led his men in an attempt to capture it, but when they were about 25 yards away the gun opened fire and this officer was mortally wounded. Upon being pulled into a trench by members of the patrol, he manifested no anxiety concerning himself, but urged his men to continue their mission.

        *Deceased.


        Home address, Mrs. C. S. Johnston, mother, Chapel Hill, N. C. (G. O. 74, W. D., 1919.)

        ISAAC M. NEWTON (Army serial number 1316085), corporal, Company H, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. With another soldier he attacked and destroyed two enemy machine-gun posts 200 yards in advance of our lines. While the other soldier stood guard at the entrance of a dugout, he entered it and brought out 75 German soldiers and 3 officers, who were taken back to our lines as prisoners.

        Home address, Frederick Newton, father, Carr, N. C. (G. O. 81, W. D., 1919.)

ONSLOW COUNTY:

        WILLIAM E. PARKER (Army serial number 2993207), private, Company E, 323d Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action at Bois de Manheulles, France, November 9-11, 1918. Private Parker gave proof of unhesitating devotion to duty and disregard for personal safety by continually volunteering and carrying messages to various units, crossing zones swept by machine-gun and heavy artillery fire.

        Next of kin, J. O. Parker, father, Verona, N. C. (G. O. 81, W. D., 1919.)


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PAMLICO COUNTY:

        EMERY W. MILLS, second lieutenant, 311th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Grand Pre, France, October 25, 1918. Lieutenant Mills asked permission to lead a platoon against strong enemy machine-gun nests which were blocking the advance of the battalion. He not only led his platoon in a daring and extraordinarily successful attack, but personally advanced ahead of his platoon and captured two machine guns. During the consolidation of the line he fearlessly walked up and down the line under intense machine-gun and artillery fire, establishing strong points and encouraging his men.

        Home address, William P. Mills, father, 516 Northcort St., Florence, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

PASQUOTANK COUNTY:

        *SETH E. PERRY (Army serial No. 1316548), corporal, Company K, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. When a portion of his company was threatened with a counter-attack and he had seen one runner killed in an attempt to reach them from company headquarters with orders to fall back, he volunteered for the dangerous mission. While crossing an open field under heavy fire, he was mortally wounded.

        *Deceased.


        Next of kin, Mrs. Mary E. Perry, mother, Okisko, N. C. (G. O. 87, W. D., 1919.)

PENDER COUNTY:

        JOHN T. WELLS (Army serial number 1315459), sergeant, Company E, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. Wounded at the start of an advance, he continued in command of his platoon and engaging in hand-to-hand fighting, bayoneted three Germans and captured several others. He displayed marked personal bravery, leading his platoon ably until forced to retire because of loss of blood from his wounds.

        Home address, Walter L. Wells, father, Watha, N. C. (G. O. 81, W. D., 1919.)

PERSON COUNTY:

        JESSE A. LUNSFORD, corporal, Company G, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. He attacked, single-handed, a machine-gun post from which a destructive fire was being directed against his company. While he was approaching the nest the machine gun shot off the butt of his rifle and cut a hole in his breeches, but he succeeded in getting close enough to the nest to throw four hand grenades into it and then killed the gunner with his bayonet.

        Residence at enlistment: R. F. D. No. 1, Timber Lake, N. C. (G. O. 126, W. D., November 11, 1919, p. 540.)

        *GUY JENNINGS WINSTEAD, first lieutenant, Company C, 38th Infantry, 3d Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near Chateau-Thierry, France, during June and July, 1918. Lieutenant Winstead led four patrols across the Marne River while exposed to heavy enemy machine-gun fire. On the second of these patrols the boat was sunk and it was necessary to swim the river. While within the enemy lines he and five others raided a German outpost,

        *Deceased.



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killing five of the enemy, and in spite of heavy enemy fire, returned with a prisoner. On July 15, 1918, shortly after leading his platoon under gas and shell fire to a position on a hill, he was killed by enemy fire.

        Next of kin, C. M. Winstead, father, Roxboro, N. C. (G. O. 27, W. D., May 10, 1920.)

PITT COUNTY:

        LEWIS B. McLAWHORN, saddler, machine-gun company, 23d Infantry. While attached to the headquarters of a machine-gun company of the _____ Infantry, near Chateau-Thierry, France, one June 6, 1918, he made eight trips as a runner to and from advance platoons. He showed heroic coolness in the face of machine-gun fire and absolute fearlessness in the execution of his work.

        Home address, Mrs. L. B. McLawhorn, wife, Winterville, N. C. (G. O. 102, W. D., 1918.)

        ALBERT JOHN PEADEN (Army serial No. 1877105), private, Company M, 118th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Vaux-Andigny, France, October 11, 1918. While delivering a message, Private Peaden was seriously wounded by a bullet which entered his cheek and passed through his lower right jaw, but he refused to be evacuated and continued on duty until the following day. Upon reporting to the aid station he was evacuated to the hospital, where the wound was found to be so serious that he was compelled to remain there for several weeks.

        Residence at enlistment: Framville, N. C. (G. O. 126, W. D. November 11, 1919, p. 544.)

ROBESON COUNTY:

        JAMES E. BRACEY (Army serial No. R154431), sergeant, first class, Company A, 1st Engineers, 1st Division. For extraordinary heroism north of Exermont, France, October 9, 1918. During the attack on Hill 269, when his group came under direct machine-gun fire, Sergeant Bracey skillfully advanced his men and then alone he rushed and captured the enemy gunner. His gallant act enabled other members of his group to close in on the enemy without loss, capturing the gun and forcing five of the enemy to surrender.

        Residence at enlistment: Rowland, N. C. (G. O. 72, W. D. December 6, 1920.)

        DUNK DAVIS (serial number 1315838), first sergeant, Company G, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. He voluntarily went forward to attack enemy machine guns which were carefully concealed and raising havoc with his section of the line. He succeeded in putting both posts out of action and killing all the occupants.

        Home address, William B. Davis, father, Red Springs, N. C. (G. O. 50, W. D., 1919.)

        GUY L. HARTMAN, first lieutenant, 6th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Frapelle, France, August 17, 1918. After having been painfully wounded, Lieutenant Hartman refused to go to the rear for treatment. He made his way through a heavy barrage and brought up a platoon that was stopped by heavy fire. Some time later, after having his wound dressed, he conducted his brigade commander through a heavily gassed area, after which he remained constantly on duty until relieved.

        Home address, Mrs. Sally Agnes Hartman, wife, St. Pauls, N. C. (G. O. 32, W. D., 1919.)


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ROCKINGHAM COUNTY:

        ALBERT J. CAYER, private, Company B, 38th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Mezy, France, July 15, 1918. During the intense enemy artillery preparation just prior to the German offensive of July 15, 1918, he voluntarily made several trips through the heaviest shelling to bring wounded comrades from the field.

        Home address, Mrs. A. J. Cayer, Reidsville, N. C. (G. O. 23, W. D., 1919.)

        LUTHER C. GRIFFITH (Army serial number 1320912), private, Company G, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. When the other members of a Lewis gun crew had become casualties, he operated the gun single-handed, and attacking an enemy machine-gun emplacement, killed the gunner and made the other two members of the crew prisoners.

        Home address, Mrs. Lizzie Griffith, mother, Reidsville, N. C. (G. O. 81, W. D., 1919.)

        *JAMES W. HUDNALL, sergeant, Company G, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. After being twice wounded, Sergeant Hudnall continued to lead his platoon in attack, capturing two machine guns. In later action he received additional wounds which caused his death.

        *Deceased.


        Emergency address: Miss Eva Hudnall, sister, Critz, Va. Residence at enlistment: Spray, N. C. (G. O. 126, W. D. November 11, 1919, p. 536.)

        DEWIE H. LAWHORNE, private, Company G, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. In the face of heavy machine-gun fire, Private Lawhorne, with two other soldiers, attacked and put out of action an enemy machine-gun post, capturing a German officer and three soldiers.

        Residence at enlistment: Draper, N. C. (G. O. 126, W. D. November 11, 1919, p. 539.)

        ROBERT O. LINDSAY, first lieutenant, Air Service, 139th Aero Squadron. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bantheville, France, October 27, 1918. In company with two other planes, Lieutenant Lindsay attacked three enemy planes (Fokker type) at an altitude of 3,000 meters, and after a sharp fight brought down one of them. While engaged with the two remaining machines, eight more planes (Fokker type) came at him from straight ahead. He flew straight through their formation, gained an advantageous position, and brought down another plane before he withdrew from the combat.

        Home address, Mrs. N. H. Lindsay, mother, Madison, N. C. (G. O. 46, W. D., 1919.)

        JAMES G. MABE, private, Company A, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. Having been seriously wounded in the shoulder by shrapnel early in the attack, Private Mabe refused to leave his platoon and, after losing his rifle, armed himself with grenades and cleaned out numerous enemy dugouts. Not until his company had taken its position for the night did he go to the rear.

        Home address, J. M. Mabe, father, Madison, N. C. (G. O. 35, W. D., 1919.)

        ROBERT S. ROSCOE, sergeant, Sanitary Detachment, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Becquigny, France, October 10, 1918. Going forward to establish an aid post, Sergeant Roscoe, finding that the advance had already started, took his position in the front line, and exposed


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to terrific fire, cared for the wounded until the medical department was brought up. Later, while bringing up rations, he encountered shell fire, and although wounded and knocked down, he quickly regained his feet and completed his mission.

        Home address, E. R. Roscoe, father, Reidsville, N. C. (G. O. 26, W. D., 1919.)

        HARVEY H. SHIVELY, private, 2d Battalion, Intelligence Section, 120th Infantry. For repeated acts of extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918, and near Becquigny, France, October 9, 1918. Near Bellicourt Private Shively, with an Australian soldier, captured 42 of the enemy, including two officers. On October 9, near Becquigny, he accompanied another soldier in penetrating the enemy's outpost line and captured two enemy machine gunners, putting the gun out of action.

        Home address Mrs. Martha Shively, mother, Spray, N. C.

        JOHN Y. STOKES, JR., first lieutenant, 20th Aero Squadron, Air Service. For extraordinary heroism in action near Etain, France, September 16, 1918. After their own formation had been broken up, Lieutenant Stokes and his pilot voluntarily continued on their bombing mission with planes from another squadron. Although their plane was thrown out of control by anti-aircraft fire, they proceeded to their objective and dropped their bombs. Their motor then died completely and they were attacked by an enemy combat plane, but they fought off the attacking machine and reached the Allied lines, where their plane crashed in a forest.

        Home address, J. Y. Stokes, father, West Market, Reidsville, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

        EUGENE P. WALKER, sergeant, Company D, 7th Engineers. For extraordinary heroism in action near Verdun, France, November 4, 1918. When three boats in a pontoon bridge were destroyed by artillery fire, he volunteered and waded into the river under heavy shell fire and, by holding up the deck until new boats were launched and placed in position, although under great physical strain, permitted the uninterrupted crossing of the infantry.

        Home address, Mrs. Sally Walker, mother, 132 Lindsey St., Reidsville, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

ROWAN COUNTY:

        ROBERT CLINE BRANTLEY (Army serial No. 244899), sergeant, Company D, 1st Gas Regiment. For extraordinary heroism in action near Malancourt Woods, France, September 26, 1918. After his detachment had been ordered to the rear, Sergeant Brantley remained to administer first aid to a wounded comrade, bringing him to safety through withering machine-gun fire.

        Home address, John P. Brantley, father, Mount Ulla, N. C. (G. O. 87, W. D., 1919.)

        DEWEY S. BROWN (Army serial number 123097), sergeant, Company E. 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. Wounded twice at the start of an advance, he remained in command of his platoon, carrying it through to a position near its objective, when he was wounded a third time and forced to retire. His personal courage was an inspiration to the men under him.

        Home address, Mrs. William E. Graham, sister, Mount Ulla, N. C. (G. O. 81, W. D., 1919.)

        EMORY L. BUTLER (Army serial number 1316455), corporal, Company K, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. Becoming separated from his platoon during the advance,


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he continued 500 yards beyond the objective, and although there were several enemy machine guns near him, he went to a dugout and forced the 35 occupants to come out and surrender. He was soon joined by other members of his platoon and aided in cleaning out other nearby dugouts, displaying absolute disregard of danger.

        Home address, Mrs. Sallie M. Butler, mother, R. F. D. No. 1, Landis, N. C. (G. O. 81, W. D., 1919.)

        WILLIAM B. LYERLY, private, Company D, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. With eight other soldiers, comprising the company headquarters detachment, he assisted his company commander in cleaning out enemy dugouts along a canal and capturing 242 prisoners.

        Home address, J. Lyerly, father, R. No. 1, Woodleaf, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

SAMPSON COUNTY:

        GEORGE S. BEATTY, second lieutenant, 7th Infantry, 3d Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near le Rocq Ferme, France, July 15, 1918. Having remained at battalion headquarters, after the relief of his battalion, when the German barrage preceding the second battle of the Marne opened, Lieutenant Beatty, realizing the gravity of the situation, voluntarily went out through heavy destructive fire on a reconnaissance of the front lines, and obtained information which could not be secured in any other manner. He encouraged the troops by his disregard for personal danger, and gave directions for the defense of the positions. It being necessary for him to remove his gas mask in order to accomplish this mission, he was seriously burned by mustard gas.

        Residence at appointment: Lisbon Street, Clinton, N. C. (G. O. 126, W. D., November 11, 1919, p. 527.)

        *BUCK A. CARTER (Army serial No. 1316101), private, Company H, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. Wounded in the hand, he continued in the advance, operating his Lewis gun effectively. He aided in the capture of two enemy machine-gun posts, inspiring those serving with him by his personal fortitude. He was killed later in the performance of duty.

        *Deceased.


        Next of kin, Louis Carter, father, Ingold, N. C. (G. O. 87, W. D., 1919.)

        HAROLD G. HUBBARD, sergeant, Company C, 115th Machine Gun Battalion. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ypres, Belgium, August 23, 1918. During heavy hostile bombardment, he voluntarily left his dugout and went through the shell fire to the assistance of his wounded platoon commander. After taking the officer to a partially sheltered position, he ran 400 yards through the barrage to secure a litter and assisted the stretcher bearer in carrying the wounded officer to a dressing station.

        Home address, T. L. Hubbard, father, Clinton, N. C. (G. O. 35, W. D., 1919.)

        LYMAN WHITE (Army serial number 1316071), sergeant, Company H, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. When, with three other men, he encountered a German patrol, which outnumbered them five to one, he ordered his companions to keep the enemy down with fire from their Lewis gun. He then crept to the


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rear of the hostile patrol and attacked the Germans with bombs. At the same time his companions attacked from the front, killing several of the Germans and capturing nine.

        Home address, Mrs. Charles White, mother, Salemburg, N. C. (G. O. 81, W. D., 1919.)

SCOTLAND COUNTY:

        LEE R. McCLELLAND, sergeant, Medical Detachment, 371st Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ardeuil, France, September 30, 1918. While administering first-aid treatment to wounded soldiers on the field, Sergeant McClelland received a painful wound on the leg, but without mentioning his injury he remained on duty, caring for the wounded under shell fire, until the regiment was relieved.

        Home address, Maria McClelland, mother, Laurinburg, N. C. (G. O. 46, W. D., 1919.)

STANLY COUNTY:

        OGDEN DOREMUS KING, lieutenant, Medical Corps, United States Navy, attached to the 6th Machine Gun Battalion, United States Marine Corps. For extraordinary heroism in action near the Bois de Belleau, June 9-10, 1918. On two successive days the regimental aid station in which he was working was struck by heavy shells and in each case demolished. Ten men were killed and a number of wounded were badly hurt by falling timbers and stone. Under these harassing conditions this officer continued without cessation his treatment of the wounded, assisting in their evacuation and setting an inspiring example of devotion and courage to the officers and men serving under him.

        Home address: Albemarle, N. C. (G. O. 137, W. D., 1918.)

        ALFRED W. SMITH (Army serial No. 1311036), private, Company E, 118th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action east of the La Selle River, France, October 17, 1918. Having become separated from his company in a fog, Private Smith, an automatic rifle gunner, attached himself to a company in the attacking wave and continued in the advance. Working his way through heavy machine-gun and shell fire, he put his automatic rifle into action, poured an enfilading fire on the enemy and aided materially in breaking the hostile resistance at a critical time.

        Home address, J. F. Smith, father, Stanfield, N. C. (G. O. 98, W. D., 1919.)

SURRY COUNTY

        DAVID U. LATHAM, wagoner, Company G, 5th Ammunition Train. For extraordinary heroism in action near Septsarges, France, October 24, 1918. When an enemy shell struck some pyrotechnics stored in the ammunition dump of his organization, he assisted in removing inflammable material and placing the fire under control. Through his coolness and courage the destruction of a large quantity of nearby ammunition was avoided.

        Home address, John Williams, uncle, Ashburn, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

        FRED C. PRUITT, sergeant, 2d Battalion, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ypres, Belgium, August 25, 1918. At imminent peril to his own life, Sergeant Pruitt and two companions extinguished a fire in an ammunition dump, caused by a bursting shell, thereby preventing the


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explosion of the dump and saving the lives of a large number of men who were in the vicinity.

        Home address, W. R. Pruitt, father, Mount Airy, N. C. (G. O. 32, W. D., 1919.)

        CLYDE SHELTON, sergeant, Company L, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Mazinghien, France, October 19, 1918. Sergeant Shelton, who was in command of a platoon, was ordered to post an automatic rifle so as to protect the right flank of his battalion, and in order to do this it was necessary to advance his line beyond a hedge and wire fence. Halting his platoon, he went forward himself and under heavy fire, in clear view of the enemy, he cut an opening in the barrier. His courageous act permitted a patrol to pass through, and the line was subsequently established with a minimum of casualties.

        Home address, William Shelton, father, R. F. D. No. 2, Mount Airy, N. C. (G. O. 44, W. D., 1919.)

UNION COUNTY:

        SAMUEL I. PARKER, second lieutenant, 28th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Exermont, France, October 5, 1918. With total disregard for his own personal danger, he advanced directly on a machine gun 150 yards away while the enemy were firing directly at him and killed the gunner with his pistol. In the town of Exermont his platoon was almost surrounded after having taken several prisoners and inflicted heavy losses on the enemy, but despite the fact that only a few men of the platoon were left, continued to fight until other troops came to their aid.

        Home address, J. J. Parker, brother, Monroe, N. C. (G. O. 44, W. D., 1919.)

VANCE COUNTY:

        JOHN H. GILL, sergeant, Headquarters Company, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. After being twice wounded during the attack, Sergeant Gill, with his trench mortar section men and stragglers who had become lost from other companies, attacked a strong machine-gun position at the junction of the tunnel and canal, and wounded the third time. During the attack he was wounded in 13 places by machine-gun bullets and shrapnel, but continued the attack with the utmost coolness and bravery.

        Home address, T. S. Gill, father, R. No. 4, Henderson, N. C.

WAKE COUNTY:

        JOHN M. BAKER, corporal, Company G, 4th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Roncheres, France, July 29, 1918. He led a patrol through heavy machine-gun fire, in an attack on an enemy nest. Seeing all the members of his patrol lying about, either killed or wounded, he courageously continued to fire, killing a sniper who had been inflicting severe losses.

        For the following act of extraordinary heroism in action near Cunel, France, October 14, 1918, he is awarded an oakleaf cluster, to be worn with the distinguished service cross. After his platoon commander had been wounded he took command, and after being wounded himself refused to go for treatment, remaining to lead his platoon for two days until relieved.

        Home address, Miss Carrie Lowry, sister, Meredith College, Raleigh, N. C. (G. O. 32 and 44, W. D., 1919.)

        CORTIS H. GARNER, private, Company G, 105th Field Signal Battalion. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt and Nauroy, France, September 28 to October 1, 1918. Attached to the headquarters of the 60th


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Infantry Brigade as a dispatch rider, he repeatedly showed exceptional bravery throughout the operations of that brigade. During the engagement near Bellicourt he particularly distinguished himself by his prompt delivery of all messages under vigorous shell fire and bombing raids by enemy aircraft, riding day and night in all kinds of weather.

        Home address, J. W. Garner, father, R. F. D. No. 3, Raleigh, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

        EDWARD C. HARRIS, second lieutenant, 321st Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Grimacourt, France, November 11, 1918. Under the fire of three machine guns, firing upon him from different directions, he took his gun through the enemy wire and mounted it. He would not permit his men to remain in such a dangerous position, and after being wounded severely, ordered his men to leave him.

        Home address, E. W. Harris, father, Wendell, N. C. (G. O. 32, W. D., 1919.)

        JAMES ALLEN HIGGS, JR., first lieutenant, Air Service, Company C, 3d Balloon Squadron. For repeated acts of extraordinary heroism in action near Pont-a-Mousson, France, July 31 and August 21, 1918, and at Gesnes, France, October 29, 1918. On July 31, near Pont-a-Mousson, he was carrying on a general surveillance of his sector from his balloon with a French soldier when an enemy plane dived from a cloud and opened fire on the balloon. In imminent danger, he remained in the basket until he had helped his French comrade, after whom he himself jumped. On August 21, in the same sector, he was performing an impotant mission, regulating artillery fire. Enemy planes attacked, and with great gallantry he remained in the basket until his assistant had jumped. On October 29, near Gesnes, he was conducting a reglage from the basket with a student observer. Attacked by enemy planes, after his balloon was burning, he would not quit his post until he had assisted his companion to escape. In each of the foregoing instances Lieutenant Higgs at once reascended in a new balloon.

        Home address: 417 North Blount Street, Raleigh, N. C. (G. O. 126, W. D. November 11, 1919.)

        *JOHN EDWIN RAY, captain, Medical Corps, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. Establishing his first-aid station in the front line, he advanced with the Infantry. He continued on with the troops, caring for the wounded, until he himself was so badly wounded that he was evacuated. He died from his wounds a few days later.

        *Deceased.


        Home address, Mrs. John E. Ray, mother, Raleigh, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

        HARRY S. SILVER, first lieutenant, 28th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Exermont, France, October 11, 1918. He led a patrol into the woods under a severe artillery and machine-gun fire, to establish liaison with the units on the left flank. He continued on his mission after three-fourths of his patrol had been killed or wounded, and succeeded in bringing valuable information to his battalion commander.

        Home address, Mrs. H. G. Turner, sister, Raleigh, N. C. (G. O. 44, W. D., 1919.)

        WILLIAM OLIVER SMITH, first lieutenant, Company D, 318th Machine Gun Battalion, 81st Division. For extraordinary heroism in action north of Haudimont, France, November 9-10, 1918. Lieutenant Smith courageously led his machine-gun platoon in an attack on the afternoon of November 9, and


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later assisted in organizing a position for defense. On November 10, the enemy launched a strong counter-attack and the Infantry withdrew under cover of the machine-gun fire. Later, when attacked by greatly superior numbers, Lieutenant Smith defended his position an hour. Although wounded three times, he persisted in his resistance, holding his position until his ammunition was exhausted, when he was taken prisoner by the enemy.

        Residence at appointment: 529 North Wilmington Street, Raleigh, N. C. (G. O. 60, W. D. September 22, 1920.)

        *ROBERT MARSHALL TEACHEY, private, Company B, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ypres, Belgium, August 2, 1918. He volunteered to accompany an officer on a daylight patrol to destroy an enemy pillbox. With great courage, under heavy shell and machine-gun fire, they rushed the pillbox, killed or wounded the occupants, and accomplished their mission.

        *Deceased.


        Home address, J. H. Teachey, father, 305 Linden Avenue, Raleigh, N. C. (G. O. 142, W. D., 1919.)

        SAMUEL F. TELFAIR, second lieutenant, 2d Anti-aircraft Machine Gun Battalion. For extraordinary heroism in action at Brieulles, France, November 4, 1918. He was leading a patrol to reconnoiter a position for anti-aircraft machine guns when his group became scattered by intense shell fire. Upon returning to the shell-swept area to look for his patrol, he found one of the men severely wounded. Making two trips through the heavy shell fire, he secured the assistance of Private Laurel B. Heath and carried the wounded soldier to safety.

        Home address, Mrs. Samuel F. Telfair, mother, Cameron Park, Raleigh, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

WAYNE COUNTY:

        EDGAR H. BAIN, captain, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Busigny, France, October 9, 1918. Advancing under heavy fire, with orders to pass through the front line company, he found the troops he was to relieve 1,000 yards from their position, falling back. Rallying them, he personally led the troops in advance under terrific fire, assaulting and capturing the assigned objective.

        Home address, Mrs. Edgar Bain, wife, Goldsboro, N. C. (G. O. 81, W. D., 1919.)

        RONALD BROGDON, pharmacist's mate, third class, United States Navy, attached to 2d Battalion, 6th Regiment, United States Marine Corps. For extraordinary heroism in action near Thiaucourt, France, September 15, 1918. He displayed exceptional courage and devotion to duty by going through heavy artillery and machine-gun fire to the aid of a wounded officer belonging to another organization. After giving first-aid treatment to the officer he carried him back to shelter.

        Home address, Mrs. Ellen Brogdon, mother, Goldsboro, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

        ROBERT BUCK, private, Company A, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. Although seriously wounded in the arm by machine-gun fire early in the engagement, Private Buck for three hours continued on duty as an automatic rifle carrier and did not go to the rear until his company had been reorganized.

        Home address, Mrs. Mathilda Buck, wife, Goldsboro, N. C. (G. O. 35, W. D., 1919.)


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WILSON COUNTY:

        *ROBERT B. ANDERSON, first lieutenant, 28th Infantry. In the attack and defense at Cantigny, France, May 28-30, 1918, he showed utter disregard for his personal safety in leading his command forward in spite of artillery and machine-gun fire. While directing the security of his men, after the advance, and in order to make certain that they were protected first, he himself was killed.

        *Deceased.


        Home address, W. S. Anderson, Wilson, N. C. (G. O. 99, W. D., 1918.)

        JOHNNIE LAMM, private, Company G, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. In the face of heavy machine-gun fire, Private Lamm, with two other soldiers, attacked and put out of action an enemy machine-gun post, capturing a German officer and three soldiers.

        Home address, Lawrence Lamm, brother, R. No. 2, Lucama, N. C. (G. O. 37, W. D., 1919.)

        *WILLIAM E. ROBBINS, private, Company A, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. During an attack by his regiment, Private Robbins was wounded in the leg. Having dressed his own wounds, he continued to advance with his Lewis gun and ammunition until he was killed by shell fire.

        *Deceased.


        Home address, Mr. L. Robbins, father, Wilson, N. C. (G. O. 21, W. D., 1919.)

YADKIN COUNTY:

        DAVID H. LOVELACE, private, Machine Gun Company, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918. His left arm having been rendered useless by a shrapnel wound, Private Lovelace continued to carry ammunition with his other arm until the objective was reached, when, against his protests, he was ordered to the rear for medical treatment.

        Home address, Mrs. Fannie Lovelace, mother, Jonesville, N. C. (G. O. 44, W. D., 1919.)

YANCEY COUNTY:

        HENRY G. HENSLEY, sergeant, Company H, 56th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Preny, France, November 1, 1918. When the position of his platoon became untenable on account of machine-gun fire from a nest in their front, Sergeant Hensley attacked the nest alone and succeeded in driving off the enemy with hand grenades.

        Home address, W. H. Hensley, father, Vixen, N. C. (G. O. 32, W. D., 1919.)

FROM COUNTIES UNDETERMINED:

        *LEWIS K. FOWLER, private, first class, Company B, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Busigny, France, October 19, 1918. He remained at his post covering the withdrawal of his company with his automatic rifle, in order that the company might take up a better position. He was instantly killed while in the performance of this mission.

        *Deceased.


        Home address, Mrs. Lonie Smith, Gardens, N. C. (G. O. 32, W. D., 1919.)

        GARLAND GREEN, private, Company D, 30th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Mezy, France, July 15, 1918. During the German artillery bombardment of July 15, h3 carried messages between company and


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battalion headquarters and although wounded in the arm, refused evacuation until relieved two days later.

        Home address, Nancy Green, mother, Bakers Creek, N. C. (G. O. 32, W. D., 1919.)

        WILLIAM D. McLELLAND, first lieutenant, Medical Corps, 314th Ambulance Company, 304th Sanitary Train, 79th Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near Nantillois and Montfaucon, France, September 29 to October 1, 1918. Lieutenant McLelland, near Nantillois, displayed untiring energy in bringing in the wounded while continually subjected to machine-gun and sharpnel fire. It was necessary to move the dressing to some abandoned German dugouts because of the heavy fire, and during the bombardment this station was set on fire and six men killed, but Lieutenant McLelland, by his coolness and courage, enabled the speedy evacuation of the wounded.

        Address: Care of the Adjutant-General of the Army, Washington, D. C. Entered military service from North Carolina. (G. O. 126, W. D., November 11, 1919, p. 541.)

        PAUL C. PASCHAL, major, 30th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action in the Bois d'Aigremont, France, July 15, 1918. During the intense artillery bombardment preceding the German drive of July 15, when the wounded were so numerous that it was impossible to care for them in the dressing stations, Major Paschal voluntarily gave up his dugout for the use of the wounded and exposed himself to the heavy fire for 10 hours. After crossing the Marne, this officer placed himself in the front line, in spite of the severe artillery barrage, in order to direct the attack, capturing two strongly fortified farmhouses and advancing his line for a distance of four kilometers. After gaining the position he remained on duty for two days without food, despite the fact that he had been wounded and gassed.

        (G. O. 32, W. D., 1919.)

        WALTER B. PHIPPS, private, Headquarters, 319th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Vilosnes, France, September 27-28, 1918. For two days and two nights he repeatedly exposed himself to heavy shell fire in directing and maintaining the battalion relay runner service. He rendered valuable service in carrying messages over fire-swept areas, directing wounded soldiers to the first-aid station, and locating a new aid station when severe bombardment necessitated its removal.

        Home address, Columbus Phipps, father, Clintwood, Va. (G. O. 7, W. D., 1919.)

        HARRY B. REACH (Army serial No. 1241545), private, Company K, 110th Infantry, 28th Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near Varennes, France, September 27, 1918. Acting as a company runner, Private Reach voluntarily carried numerous messages under heavy machine-gun fire, displaying marked courage and devotion to duty.

        Residence at enlistment: Broad Street, Pennsgrove, N. C. (G. O. 126, W. D., November 11, 1919, p. 545.)

        ARCHIE RIDDIC, private, Company F, 120th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Vaux-Andigny, France, October 19, 1918. When the position of his company had become untenable because of enemy machine-gun and artillery fire, Private Riddic, with another soldier, the sole survivors of a Lewis machine-gun team, covered the retreat of their company. Clinging to their advanced post throughout the day, they took up the advance with the company at dusk that evening.

        Home address, James H. Riddic, father, Balvaden, N. C. (G. O. 44, W. D., 1919.)


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NORTH CAROLINA MEN AWARDED THE DISTINGUISHED SERVICE MEDAL

        SAMUEL T. ANSELL, brigadier general, United States Army. For especially meritorious and conspicuous services as Acting Judge Advocate General of the Army, whose broad and constructive interpretations of law and regulations have greatly facilitated the conduct of the war and military administration.

        Address: 1926 Belmont Road N. W., Washington, D. C. Entered Military Academy from North Carolina. (G. O. 126, W. D., November 11, 1919, 841.)

        MARION S. BATTLE, colonel, Coast Artillery Corps, United States Army. For exceptionally meritorious and conspicuous services. As Artillery Information Officer of the 1st Army he efficiently operated this important service. Later, he commanded with distinction a regiment of Artillery in the Army of Occupation. Subsequently, as Provost Marshal of Paris, he performed duties of a most difficult nature with unfailing tact, efficiency, and sound judgment. He has demonstrated organizing ability and executive capacity to a marked degree and he has been a contributing factor toward the raising of the morale and efficiency of the American Expeditionary Forces in Paris. He has rendered services of particular merit to the American Expeditionary Forces.

        Address: Care of the Adjutant General of the Army, Washington, D. C. Entered military service from North Carolina. (G. O. 60, W. D., September 22, 1920.)

        HENRY W. BUTNER, brigadier general, United States Army. For exceptionally meritorious and conspicuous services. He commanded, with marked distinction, the 1st Field Artillery Brigade from August 18 to November 11, 1918, displaying at all times keen tactical ability, initiative, and loyal devotion to duty. By his high military attainments and sound judgment he proved to be a material factor in the successes achieved by the divisions whose advances he supported.

        Address: Care of The Adjutant General of the Army, Washington, D. C. Entered Military Academy from North Carolina. (G. O. 19, W. D., March 27, 1920.)

        SAMSON L. FAISON, brigadier general, United States Army. For exceptionally meritorious and distinguished service. He commanded with great credit the 60th Infantry Brigade in the breaking of the enemy's Hindenburg line at Bellicourt, France, and in subsequent operations in which important captures were made, all marking him as a military commander of great energy and determination.

        Address: Care of The Adjutant General of the Army, Washington, D. C. Entered Military Academy from North Carolina. (G. O. 126, W. D., November 11, 1919, p. 889.)

        HARLEY B. FERGUSON, brigadier general, Corps of Engineers, United States Army. For exceptionally meritorious and distinguished service. As chief engineer of the 2d Army Corps and later of the 2d Army, he demonstrated high professional attainments and marked initiative. Through his foresight and skill in directing important technical operations, he was a notable factor in the successes of the combat troops, rendering invaluable services to the American Expeditionary Forces.

        Address: Care of The Adjutant General of the Army, Washington, D. C. Entered Military Academy from North Carolina. (G. O. 126, W. D., November 11, 1919, p. 890.)


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        ERNEST GRAVES, colonel, Corps of Engineers, United States Army. For exceptionally meritorious and distinguished services. He was charged with the construction of the Gievres storage depot and later was appointed Engineer officer of the intermediate section, Services of Supply, where he was placed in charge of all construction projects west of Bourges. As Engineer officer of Base Section No. 2 and of the advance section, Services of Supply, he performed the duties with which he was intrusted in a conspicuously meritorious manner. In the many responsible capacities in which he was employed the performance of his duty was characterized by sound judgment and untiring zeal.

        Address: Care of The Adjutant General of the Army, Washington, D. C. Entered Military Academy from North Carolina. (G. O. 126, W. D., November 11, 1919, p. 901.)

        JOHN W. GULICK, colonel, Coast Artillery Corps, United States Army. For exceptionally meritorious and conspicuous services. As assistant chief of the operations section and later as chief of staff of the Army Artillery of the 1st Army he demonstrated a keen conception of all of the tactical situations which confronted the artillery of the 1st Army. By his high professional attainments and sound military judgment, he handled the many complex problems of the 1st Army Artillery with marked skilled and thereby contributed in no small degree to the success of this unit in the St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne offensives.

        Address: Care of The Adjutant General of the Army, Washington, D. C. Entered military service from North Carolina. (G. O. 19, W. D., March 27, 1920.)

        EDGAR M. HALYBURTON (Army serial No. 42848), sergeant, Company F, 16th Infantry, 1st Division. For exceptionally meritorious and conspicuous services. Sergeant Halyburton, while a prisoner in the hands of the German government from November, 1917, to November, 1918, voluntarily took command of the different camps in which he was located and under difficult conditions established administrative and personnel headquarters, organized the men into units, billeted them systematically, established sanitary regulations, and made equitable distribution of supplies; he established an intelligence service to prevent our men giving information to the enemy and prevent the enemy introducing propaganda. His patriotism and leadership under trying conditions were an inspiration to his fellow-prisoners and contributed greatly to the amelioration of their hardships.

        Residence at enlistment: Stony Point (Alexander County), N. C. (G. O. 72, W. D., December 6, 1920.)

        PAUL C. HUTTON, colonel, Medical Corps, United States Army. For exceptionally meritorious and distinguished services. As chief surgeon of the Paris group from June 2 to July 26, 1918, during which period by his good judgment and untiring energy he provided a hospitalization and evacuation system that insured prompt and excellent care and treatment of the wounded, he furnished the means for saving many lives, and provided comfort for the wounded, thereby greatly adding to the morale of the combatant troops of both the Americans and French engaged in the second battle of the Marne.

        Address: Care of The Adjutant General of the Army, Washington, D. C. Entered military service from North Carolina. (G. O. 126, W. D., November 11, 1919, p. 914.)

        JOHN VAN BOKKELEN METTS, colonel, 119th Infantry, 30th Division. For exceptionally meritorious and conspicuous services. He commanded with marked distinction the 119th Infantry from the time of its organization and


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early training period to the completion of the active combat operations in the Ypres-Lys and Somme offensives. He especially distinguished himself while in command of his regiment on September 29, 1918, during the assault on the Hindenburg line, near Bellicourt, France, where he displayed marked ability and sound judgment. He has rendered services of signal worth to the American Expeditionary Forces.

        Residence at appointment: Wilmington (New Hanover County), N. C. (G. O. 55, W. D., September 9, 1920.)

        SIDNEY WHITFIELD MINOR, colonel, Infantry, 60th Infantry Brigade, 30th Division. For exceptionally meritorious and conspicuous services. As commander of the 120th Infantry from the time of its organization and training to the completion of active combat operations in the Ypres-Lys and Somme offensives, he displayed at all times initiative and sound judgment. During the attack on the Hindenburg line, near Bellicourt, France, September 29, 1918, and during the subsequent advance he handled his regiment with distinction, capturing several towns, numerous cannon, and many prisoners. He has rendered services of material worth to the American Expeditionary Forces.

        Residence at appointment: Durham (Durham County), N. C. (G. O. 55, W. D., September 9, 1920.)

        WILLIAM P. WOOTEN, colonel, Corps of Engineers, United States Army. For exceptionally meritorious and distinguished services. He served with credit as commanding officer of the 14th Railway Engineers during the operations of that regiment on the British front. Subsequently, while corps engineer of the 3d Army Corps, by his energy, foresight, and skill in accomplishing important engineering works, he contributed materially to the successful operations of his corps. Later, when appointed engineer of the 3d Army, he performed important duties in a most creditable manner.

        Address: Care of The Adjutant General of the Army, Washington, D. C. Entered Military Academy from North Carolina. (G. O. 126, W. D., November 11, 1919, p. 1000.)


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OUR DEAD

        Eighty-two thousand North Carolinians fought in the war. One thousand six hundred of these gave their lives in battle. These are the men whom we should especially honor today. Some day their names and homes will all be known. But scholars will have to work a long time to get them all right. In the meantime you should learn as many as you can of the men from your own county who died. Their names should be read on Armistice Day, and hymns sung and prayers offered in their memory. Some of these men have been brought back from France and are now buried in their home cemeteries. Their graves should be visited this day, and decorated with flowers. Remember that these men died for us, and honor them always.


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TO PEACE WITH VICTORY


                         I could not welcome you, O longed-for Peace,
                         Unless your coming had been heralded
                         By victory! The legions who have bled
                         Had elsewise died in vain for our release.


                         But now that you come sternly, let me kneel
                         And pay my tribute to the myriad dead,
                         Who counted not the blood that they have shed
                         Against the goal their valor shall reveal.


                         Ah! what had been the shame, had all the stars
                         And stripes of our brave flag dropped still unfurled,
                         When the fair freedom of the weary world
                         Hung in the balance. Welcome then the scars!


                         Welcome the sacrifice! With lifted head
                         Our Nation greets dear Peace as honor's right;
                         And ye the Brave, the Fallen in the fight,
                         Had ye not perished, then were honor dead!

Literary Digest--Corinne Roosevelt Robinson.

BENEDICTION


                         "Lord God of Hosts,
                         Be with us yet,
                         Lest we forget, lest we forget."


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THE STAR-SPANGLED BANNER


                         Oh! say, can you see, by the dawn's early light,
                         What so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming;
                         Whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro' the perilous fight--
                         O'er the ramparts we watched--were so gallantly streaming?
                         And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
                         Gave proof thro' the night that our flag was still there;
                         Oh! say, does that star-spangled banner still wave
                         O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?


                         On the shore, dimly seen thro' the mists of the deep,
                         Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes,
                         What is that which the breeze o'er the towering steep,
                         As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses?
                         Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam,
                         In full glory reflected, now shines in the stream;
                         'Tis the star-spangled banner, Oh! long may it wave
                         O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!


                         And where is that band who so vauntingly swore
                         That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion,
                         A home and a country should leave us no more?
                         Their blood has washed out their foul footsteps' pollution;
                         No refuge could save the hireling and slave
                         From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave.
                         And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
                         O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.


                         Oh! thus be it ever when free-men shall stand
                         Between their loved homes and the war's desolation;
                         Blest with vict'ry and peace, may the heav'n-rescued land
                         Praise the pow'r that hath made and preserved us a nation;
                         Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just,
                         And this be our motto, "In God is our trust."
                         And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave
                         O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.


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BATTLE HYMN OF THE REPUBLIC


                         Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord;
                         He is trampling out the vintage where the grapes of wrath are stored;
                         He hath loosed the fateful lightning of His terrible swift sword;
                         His truth is marching on.


                         CHORUS: Glory, glory, hallelujah! Glory, glory, hallelujah!
                         Glory, glory, hallelujah! His truth is marching on.


                         I have seen Him in the watch-fires of a hundred circling camps;
                         They have builded Him an altar in the evening dews and damps;
                         I can reach His righteous sentence by the dim and flaring lamps;
                         His day is marching on.


                         [CHORUS.]
                         I have read a fiery gospel, writ in burnished rows of steel,
                         "As ye deal with my contemners, so with you my grace shall deal;
                         Let the Hero, born of woman, crush the serpent with His heel,"
                         Since God is marching on.


                         [CHORUS.]
                         He has sounded forth the trumpet that shall never call retreat;
                         He is sifting out the hearts of men before His judgment seat;
                         Oh! be swift, my soul, to answer Him, be jubilant, my feet;
                         Our God is marching on.


                         [CHORUS.]
                         In the beauty of the lilies, Christ was born across the sea,
                         With a glory in His bosom that transfigures you and me;
                         As He died, to make men holy, let us die, to make men free,
                         While God is marching on.


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MARSEILLAISE


                         Ye sons of Freedom, wake to glory!
                         Hark! hark! what myriads bid you rise;
                         Your children, wives, and grandsires hoary,
                         Behold their tears, and hear their cries,
                         Behold their tears, and hear their cries.
                         Shall lawless tyrants, mischief breeding,
                         With hireling host, a ruffian band,
                         Affright and desolate the land,
                         While peace and liberty lie bleeding?
                         To arms! to arms! ye brave,
                         The patriot sword unsheath;
                         March on, march on, all hearts resolv'd
                         On liberty or death!


                         O Liberty! can man resign thee,
                         Once having felt thy glorious flame?
                         Can tyrants' bolts and bars confine thee,
                         And thus thy noble spirit tame,
                         And thus thy noble spirit tame?
                         Too long our country wept, bewailing
                         The bloodstain'd sword our conqu'rors wield;
                         But freedom is our sword and shield,
                         And all their arts are unavailing.
                         To arms! to arms! ye brave,
                         The patriot sword unsheath;
                         March on, march on, all hearts resolv'd
                         On liberty or death!