Documenting the American South Logo
Loading

Women and the War in North Carolina:
Electronic Edition.

Tate, Mabel and Naomi Neal


Funding from the State Library of North Carolina
supported the electronic publication of this title.


Text transcribed by Apex Data Services, Inc.
Images scanned by Harris Henderson
Text encoded by Apex Data Services, Inc., Harris Henderson, and Jill Kuhn Sexton
First edition, 2002
ca. 80K
Academic Affairs Library, UNC-CH
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
2002.

        © This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text.

Source Description:
(title page) Women and the War in North Carolina
(caption) Women and the War in North Carolina. A Partial Report of the Work of Women in North Carolina During the First Year of the War, April 2, 1917--April 2, 1918--Based Upon Material Collected by the Department of History of the State Normal and Industrial College, and Compiled by Misses Mabel Tate and Naomi Neal, of the Class of 1918.
[Mabel Tate and Naomi Neal]
[11] p.
[Greensboro? N.C. ]
[State Normal and Industrial College?]
[1918?]
Call number Cp970.9 T21w (North Carolina Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)


        The electronic edition is a part of the UNC-CH digitization project, Documenting the American South.
        The text has been entered using double-keying and verified against the original.
        The text has been encoded using the recommendations for Level 4 of the TEI in Libraries Guidelines.
        Original grammar, punctuation, and spelling have been preserved. Encountered typographical errors have been preserved, and appear in red type.
        All footnotes are inserted at the point of reference within paragraphs.
        Any hyphens occurring in line breaks have been removed, and the trailing part of a word has been joined to the preceding line.
        All quotation marks, em dashes and ampersand have been transcribed as entity references.
        All double right and left quotation marks are encoded as " and " respectively.
        All single right and left quotation marks are encoded as ' and ' respectively.
        All em dashes are encoded as --
        Indentation in lines has not been preserved.
        Spell-check and verification made against printed text using Author/Editor (SoftQuad) and Microsoft Word spell check programs.


Library of Congress Subject Headings

Languages Used:

LC Subject Headings:


Revision History:


Illustration

[Title Page Image]


Women and the War
in North Carolina


Page 1

WOMEN AND THE WAR IN NORTH CAROLINA.

A Partial Report of the Work of Women in North Carolina During the First Year of the War, April 2, 1917--April 2, 1918--Based Upon Material Collected by the Department of History of the State Normal and Industrial College, and Compiled by Misses Mabel Tate and Naomi Neal, of the Class of 1918.

        We read from time to time, in the daily press, of the work of the women of the warring nations abroad. Name any field you like--munitions, hospitals, police, mail-carriers, omnibus conductors--and you find women replacing the men in various situations and occupations. Even on or near the battle-front, they answer the call of bleeding and crushed humanity, as in every other field of work, with successful and untiring efforts to conserve and construct. As the shadow of the great war is thrown athwart our own land, women are called upon to "do their bit" here in ways no less untried.

        "The achievement of American women in the world war of 1917 will stand in no shadowy and uncertain outline against the background of the history that the future generations will read; for woman's share in the nation's task in this gigantic struggle for the freedom of the races is to mark a new era, both in the conduct of the war and in the history of the woman movement." No sooner had this country been forced into the conflict than national leaders as individuals began to pay high tributes to the value of woman's work in the prosecution of the war and to ask for the co-operation and assistance of the women in formulating the war emergency program. President Wilson pays this tribute to the women of America:

        "I think the whole country has appreciated the way in which the women have risen to this great occasion. They have not only done what they have been asked to do, and done it with ardor and efficiency, but they have shown a power to organize for doing things, on their own initiative, which is quite a different and a very much more difficult thing. I think the whole country has admired the spirit and devotion of the women of the United States. It goes without saying that the country depends upon the women for a large part of the inspiration of its life. That is obvious. But it is now depending upon the women also for suggestions of service, which have been rendered in abundance and with distinction of originality." Such a tribute is being paid by scores of nationally influential individuals.

        Not only those heroic women who, as Red Cross Nurses, will accompany our soldiers to France, and those who, at home, are devoting their time, talents, and energies to work specifically connected with the war, but all of our women can do and are doing their part to bring the great struggle to a successful conclusion. The home-makers are doing their part by careful and intelligent planning, by the most economic and wise use of food supplies. Others are striving to place about the Army and Navy environments which will conduce to improved


Page 2

military morale and efficiency of our fighting forces and place the Army and Navy upon a higher standard. Only a few may have the opportunity of rendering service at the front; but there will be important work for those who remain in the country. For the nursing profession, there is the Public Health Nursing and Child Welfare Work which must not be neglected. To relieve medical men for service at the front, women physicians might also be employed for service at convalescent hospitals at home in the treatment of soldiers who return on account of chronic conditions. In civil life, many positions can be filled by women, releasing men for service. For many without business or professional training, or for the spare moments of those who have family duties or are self-supporting, there remains the great work of collecting and distributing useful articles for our soldiers and sailors through the many organizations conducted for this purpose. And it would be well for the millions of women of America to appreciate "how much their individual effort adds to the final sum of our national effort."

        Although it is far too early to write even the first chapter of North Carolina's part in the present conflict, the brief report of what her women are trying to do, as given in the following account, should stimulate and stir the ambition of every loyal North Carolinian. As suggested by a pamphlet issued by the History Department of the State Normal College:

        "This being the State College for Women, we are endeavoring to collect material concerning the war work of the women of the state.

        "This material is to be permanently preserved here, so that when the Historian of the future comes to tell the story of this great epoch, unlike the Historian who tries to write of woman's part in the life of former days, he will not lack ample and correct records."


        This college has in practically every county in the state a representative--in every instance a woman and in most instances an alumna of the college--who is voluntarily collecting and sending to the college for permanent preservation all the material that can be secured in her county concerning the war work of the women. These representatives are to continue their work, as long as they can, sending in any reports, at any time, which have even the least bearing on this subject. It is to be regretted that reports from many of the counties are incomplete, but it should be borne in mind that much difficulty in securing the necessary information is due to the fact that, heretofore, no especial attention has been directed towards the effective recording of statistics and reports of such work done by individuals and various organizations in any community. Thus the report below of the work of the women in North Carolina for the first year of the war is somewhat inadequate, although much valuable and inspiring material has been received and filed by the History Department.


Page 3

FOOD PRODUCTION AND CONSERVATION.

        The following counties reported on Food Production and Conservation:

        

        In practically every county there is one or more Home Demonstration Agents. Every county has a large number of families who have signed the pledge cards in the interest of Food Conservation. War gardens are fast becoming popular.

PHYSICIANS AND NURSES.

        Among the women of whom North Carolina shall ever be proud are service in the camps either in this country or in France. The list as the physicians and nurses who have nobly volunteered and are now in reported by the representatives is as follows:

        
County Name Location
Burke-- Miss Mary Murphy Red Cross Nurse in France
Caldwell-- Dr. Margaret Castex Sturgis Not reported
Caldwell-- Miss Helen Grist Not reported
Caldwell-- Miss Mabel Goforth Not reported
Caldwell-- Miss Elizabeth Harrison Not reported
Cherokee-- Miss Nina Axley Red Cross Nurse in El Paso, Tex.
Forsyth-- Miss Iseley Not reported
Forsyth-- Miss Elizabeth Clingman Not reported
Forsyth-- Miss Maud Chalmers Not reported
Forsyth-- Miss Bodenhamer Not reported
Forsyth-- Miss Ione Branche Not reported
Forsyth-- Miss Valley Armstrong Not reported
Forsyth-- Miss Mary Ambler Not reported
Forsyth-- Miss Mamie Timberlake Not reported
Forsyth-- Miss Treva Kirk Not reported
Forsyth-- Miss Ada F. Page Not reported
Forsyth-- Miss Luella Chrisman Not reported
Forsyth-- Miss Maud Benge Not reported
Forsyth-- Miss Nora Taylor Not reported
Guilford-- Dr. Mary S. Miles Chairman Red Cross Educational Com.
Guilford-- Dr. Anna M. Gove Civil Relief Service in France
Guilford-- Dr. Joy Harris Glascock Not reported
Lee-- Miss Ruth Wicker Member Dr. J. W. Long's Hosp. Unit No. 65
Lee-- Miss Laura Doub Member of U. S. Army Hospital No. 16
Macon-- Dr. Mary E. Lapham Supt. of Tuberculosis Hosp. in France
Macon-- Miss Annie Vaughn Dr. Lapham's private secretary
Macon-- Miss Margaret Bryson Volunteer to go to France


Page 4

County Name Location
Sampson-- Miss Mary Herring Red Cross Nurse in France

NEW OCCUPATIONS.

        Eager to grasp every opportunity of service, the women have entered new occupations. In the Navy, two North Carolinians have been reported as yeomen:

        
Miss Kathleen Michaux Burke County.
Miss Earle White Pamlico County.

        As an appreciation of the way in which the women of North Carolina have entered upon their new fields, we are glad to quote the following letter:

        "When the work of the Legal Advisory Board for the County of Vance, in aiding registrants with their questionaires, threatened to assume proportions beyond the ability of the board, the chairman invited Miss Leah H. Perry to form a woman's auxiliary board. She promptly undertook the work, and gathered a number of ladies, who were assigned offices in the Law Building, occupied by Mr. Bennett H. Perry previous to his entering the military service. These ladies were appointed full associate members of the Legal Advisory Board, and took the oath of office required by law. Their service was equal to the best. Their quick intelligence enabled them to handle the work efficiently, and with dispatch. They attended during office hours as promptly, remained on duty as steadily, and did their work as well as any man connected with the work. It was largely owing to the very high efficiency of their service that not once during the period of the questionaires issues was the work of the Legal Advisory Board carried over to the next day. It is the only instance, I know, where women received such appointment. I have very great pleasure in testifying to the value of this work, and still more pleasure in expressing my personal appreciation, and that of the board, of the unselfish, devoted patriotic service of these ladies. I desire to mention them by name; that this thing which they have done shall be spoken of as a memorial of them. They are:

        

THOMAS M. PITTMAN,
Chairman Legal Advisory Board for Vance County."


YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION.

        We have only one report of the Y. W. C. A. work and that is from Greensboro, Guilford County. It shows the wonderful possibilities of such an organization:

        "The Greensboro Y. W. C. A. of which Mrs. D. H. Blair was president for 1917 and Mrs. C. D. McIver for 1918, has a membership of 888 and employs three full-time secretaries. Miss Ewing, general secretary, Miss Hammerly, secretary girls' work, and Miss Yopp, Traveller's


Page 5

Aid secretary, whose work is done under the auspices of the Y. M. and Y. W. C. A.

        "The amount subscribed by Greensboro for the Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. War work Fund, was $21,114.26, most of which was gained through the work of the Y. W. C. A.

        "The Educational Committee of which Mrs. G. W. Whitsett is chairman, reports 5 First Aid classes for 1917, total membership 150; 2 French classes, 2 gymnasium classes and 1 class in telegraphy. Total membership of various classes for 1917, 1555.

        "The Eight Weeks Club with membership of 40, did especially good community service during the summer.

        "The Patriotic League, organized just before Christmas under the auspices of the Y. W. C. A. has 300 members, and is constantly increasing in size and influence. Groups have been organized in the schools of the city, at Jamestown, Pomona, and the mill villages, and are co-operating with the Red Cross and other organizations in all forms of patriotic service.

        "The Traveller's Aid service has and is accomplishing an untold amount of good in this time of increased travel, combined with lack of proper facilities."


COLLEGES.

        A few of the colleges for women have been heard from; and the reports are indeed gratifying.

        "The colleges located in Guilford County need no comment on their patriotic work. It speaks for itself."

STATE NORMAL COLLEGE.

        "The students of the State Normal College pledged $5,000 to the Y. W. C. A. War Friendship Fund, and by December 1917 had paid in $5,012.10, $2,012.10 in excess of their assessment. This record led the entire Southern division per capita pledges, and in collection of same.

        "Every class and both Societies subscribed to the Second Liberty Loan.

        "The College Red Cross Auxiliary, the largest of its kind in the state, has a membership of 263, with Miss Belle Mitchell as chairman. Besides the work regularly carried on during the term, each holiday has been devoted to Red Cross work. On these holidays alone, the girls have made 25,000 surgical dressings, 91 comfort pillows, 275 trench candles, 300 pairs hospital socks, in addition to the unfinished garments not reported.

        "For entertainments, a concert Dec. 19, 1917, and a Pageant Feb. 7, 1918, have been given by the college auxiliary.

        "Five hundred and seventy-six of the Normal College students signed a petition to their congressmen, asking them, to vote in favor of woman suffrage.

        "The college authorities have engaged Miss Minnie L. Jameson to do extension work throughout the state for the conservation of food,


Page 6

and have arranged courses and lectures for the summer months to aid in spreading information and assist the government in the prosecution of the war."

GREENSBORO COLLEGE FOR WOMEN.

        "The Greensboro College for Women has organized a Patriotic League with membership of 181, and its Red Cross Auxiliary numbers 51. They have reported a total of 57 knitted garments, 750 compresses, 11 bed shirts, and work for Belgian refugees, and have contributed a total of 55 books for the soldiers' library.

        "The faculty and students have purchased Liberty Bonds and War Savings Stamps to the value of $2,405.00 and have contributed $876.00 to the Y. W. C. A. War Friendship Fund, and $86.00 to the Armenians.

        "All the students have signed the food pledge and special instruction is being given regarding conservation and substitution of foodstuffs needed by the Allies."

GUILFORD COLLEGE

        "At Guilford College the various classes and societies have given up the customary forms of entertainments in order to purchase Liberty Bonds, have pledged themselves to the strict conservation of food, and the students are giving much of their time to various phases of Red Cross and Belgian relief work."

SALEM COLLEGE.

        The Forsyth County report contains an account of the splendid work done by the student body of Salem College.

        "Last spring a vigorous campaign was begun to raise funds for a much needed gymnasium. In order to make their contributions the young ladies did various kinds of work, such as polishing shoes, shampooing and washing. In the fall, the campaign was changed into a Liberty Loan campaign. The student body at present owns $850.00 in Liberty Bonds and $330.40 in War Savings Certificates. Beginning early in the fall active Red Cross work was begun at Salem. A large amount of knitting has been done; also a large amount of surgical dressings. Last fall even before the request came from the government, Salem adopted a wheatless day. All during the winter and spring one meatless and two wheatless days have been observed by the institution, meeting with hearty co-operation on the part of the students. In answer to the call of the Students' Friendship War Fund the Salem girls responded splendidly. There was much real sacrifice made and the splendid amount of $1,872.50 was raised. The one hundred per cent. efficiency in thrift stamps was started in the Academy by the sixth grade. The other grades and all four College classes soon followed suit. At present, the whole institution stands one hundred per cent. in thrift stamps. The Salem girls have made a beautiful service flag which will be hung in Memorial Hall. This flag contains eighty-one blue stars and one gold star representing the fathers and brothers who are in the nation's service."


Page 7

Data Compiled From Reports of the County Representatives to Department of History.

        
COUNTIES ORGANIZATIONS-Red Cross WORK ACCOMPLISHED Comfort Bags Layettes Belgian Relief CONTRIBUTIONS SECOND LIBERTY LOAN
Chapters Auxiliaries Membership Clubs Surgical Supplies Hospital Supplies Knitted Articles Christ mas Boxes No. of Women Purchasers Amount
Alamance 3 ..... 900 ..... ..... 1,780 1,924 105 294 $200.00 98 $46,500.00
Alexander ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Alleghany ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Anson 1 4 471 ..... 9,000 1,000 934 ..... 1,400 1,500.00 150*

        *--Estimated.


46,000.00
Ashe ..... 1 85 ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 160 ..... 10*

        *--Estimated.


800.00
Avery 1 ..... 625 ..... 250 ..... ..... 24 ..... ..... 4 250.00
Beaufort 1 7 1,500 ..... 2,339 830 2,192 440 186 1,329.80 166 48,150.00
Bertie 1 ..... ..... ..... 3 cases ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Bladen ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Brunswick ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 8 550.00
Buncombe 1 ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Burke 1 ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 75 ..... 75.00 78 8,900.00
Cabarrus ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 103 13,600.00
Caldwell 1 ..... 825 9 ..... 622 ..... ..... 320 3,097.31 46 15,550.00
Camden ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Carteret 1 2 135 ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 90 ..... 28 7,550.00
Caswell ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Catawba ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 50*

        *--Estimated.


2,500.00
Chatham ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 18 3,450.00
Cherokee 1 1 ..... 1 246 221 367 ..... ..... 16.00 ..... .....
Chowan ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 70 51,900.00
Clay ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Cleveland ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 149 17,500.00
Columbus 2 17 2,000 ..... ..... 1,500 1,200 ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Craven ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Cumberland 1 ..... ..... 4 2,054 1,961 500 125 ..... 538.00 80 15,000.00
Currituck ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Dare ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 3 *200.00

        *--Estimated.


Davidson 1 3 ..... ..... ..... 516 1,089 ..... ..... 3,808.93 100*

        *--Estimated.


108,050.00
Davie ..... 1 120 ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 400.00 22 11,450.00
Duplin 1 ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 182.87 ..... .....
Durham ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 214 75,000.00
Edgecombe ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Forsyth 1 10 10,600 30 114,377 5,732 4,661 5 211 ..... ..... .....
Franklin ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Gaston 1 14 1,859 4 1,992 20,562 162 ..... 10,497.08 314 31,700.00
Gates ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Graham ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Granville ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Greene ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Guilford 2 14 6,240 10 66,102 5,055 2,905 423 1440 20,000.00 350*

        *--Estimated.


*200,000.00

        *--Estimated.


Halifax ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 68*

        *--Estimated.


27,200.00
Harnett 1 2 319 ..... 702 228 133 ..... ..... ..... 16 1,600.00
Haywood ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Henderson 1 ..... 760 ..... 2,509 ..... 121 83 ..... 870.35 61 34,450.00
Hertford 1 ..... 246 ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Hoke ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 4 500.00
Hyde ..... 4 ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 100.00 43 3,900.00
Iredell ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 45 3,550.00
Jackson ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Johnston ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Jones ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 16 1,150.00
Lee 1 2 ..... ..... 12,675 42 783 3 29 ..... 95 11,550.00
Lenoir 1 3 1,425 11 ..... 697 705 16 471 ..... 125*

        *--Estimated.


*20,000.00

        *--Estimated.


Lincoln ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Macon ..... 3 315 ..... ..... ..... ..... 73 ..... 500.00 ..... .....
Madison ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Martin ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
McDowell ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Mecklenb'g ..... ..... ..... 1 ..... 120 ..... ..... 135 ..... 815 145,200.00
Mitchell ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 5 700.00
Montgom'y ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 20 7,500.00
Moore ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 96*

        *--Estimated.


*65,450.00

        *--Estimated.


Nash ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
N. Hanover 1 ..... 5,000 1 91 cases ..... 100 ..... 300 3,135.92 582 114,100.00
Northamp'n ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 22*

        *--Estimated.


7,000.00
Onslow ..... 1 155 ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 13 25,000.00
Orange ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 30 79,800.00
Pamlico ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 5 2,500.00
Pasquotank ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 200*

        *--Estimated.


43,400.00
Pender ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Perquimans 1 ..... ..... ..... 3 cases ..... ..... ..... ..... 179.00 30*

        *--Estimated.


10,000.00
Person ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 88 16,350.00
Pitt 1 16 1,828 ..... 72 7 cases 130 ..... 255 5 202.44 50*

        *--Not complete.


25,000.00
Polk 1 5 ..... ..... 21,438 ..... 291 1319 ..... 2,770.00 19*

        *--Not complete.


2,800.00
Randolph 1 ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 269 ..... ..... 90.00 47 10,500.00
Richmond ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Robeson ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Rockingham ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 20*

        *--Not complete.


*7,000.00

        *--Not complete.


Rowan 1 ..... 1,936 ..... 7,143 ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 119 34,800.00
Rutherford ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 71*

        *--Not complete.


5,900.00
Sampson 1 7 574 ..... ..... 6 cases ..... ..... ..... 498.00 28 13,050.00
Scotland ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 74 49,650.00
Stanly 1 300 1 3,169 ..... 1,673 ..... ..... 809.37 13 850.00
Stokes ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 8 500.00
Surry ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Swain ..... 1 ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Transylv'ia 1 5 ..... ..... 9,030 231 266 ..... ..... ..... 27 .....
Tyrrell ..... 1 ..... ..... ..... ..... 34 ..... 26 ..... 11 750.00
Union ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 50*

        *--Not complete.


1,250.00
Vance 1 3 1,386 ..... 14,086 200 1,336 ..... ..... ..... 93 15,500.00
Wake ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 563 109,450.00
Warren ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Washingt'n ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Watauga ..... 1 ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 16 1,250.00
Wayne ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Wilkes 1 7 600 4 150 1,000 ..... ..... 127.00 56 6,900.00
Wilson ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 287 91,000.00
Yadkin ..... 3 ..... ..... ..... 8 25 ..... 6 ..... 6 550.00
Yancey ..... 1 33 1 76 76 140 ..... ..... 66.50 ..... .....
37 139 40,237 77 267,260 40,834 22,778 2,853 5,323 $55,993.57 5,998 $1,702,200.00
97 cases 13 cases


Page 8

REPORTS OF AMERICAN RED CROSS CHAPTERS IN NORTH CAROLINA.*

        *--This report was furnished by A. D. Andrews, Assistant Director, Bureau of Development, American Red Cross, Atlanta, Ga.


        
CHAPTER Branches & Auxiliaries Surgical Dressings Hospital Garments Knitted Articles Miscellaneous Articles
Acme 2 775 70 94 142
Ahoskie 1 241 50 0 161
Andrews 0 36 73 45 0
Anson County 7 2075 696 941 60
Asheville 7 41981 2790 1198 1421
Atkinson 0 96 162 6 0
Bakersville 0 0 0 0 0
Banner Elk 3 301 85 0 0
Beaufort 0 360 84 32 3
Beaufort County 9 4114 125 521 623
Bertie County 0 935 392 392 620
Bladen County 1 486 150 43 0
Bolton 0 0 35 107 0
Burgaw 2 3930 115 12 158
Burke County 3 5830 140 242 50
Burlington 0 160 544 1171 457
Cabarrus County 0 11984 377 302 152
Caldwell County 2 300 30 100 45
Canton 0 0 0 0 0
Carthage 0 0 82 407 54
Chadbourn 5 240 391 229 622
Chapel Hill 0 13127 208 340 135
Charlotte 24 14641 7 42 0
Chatham County 4 1883 16 0 226
Cherokee County 0 390 52 221 0
Chowan County 5 4832 72 125 0
Clarkton 0 648 54 48 195
Clayton 0 19465 234 461 663
Creswell 0 0 0 14 87
Duplin County 0 2460 487 76 349
Durham 2 15106 561 511 1437
Edgecombe Co. 7 15980 60 831 221
Elizabeth City 0 3480 135 62 100
Enfield 0 0 96 55 496
Fairmont 6 11 273 157 146
Fayetteville 9 2488 276 411 602
Franklinton 2 8337 0 66 139
Gaston County 12 12695 54 359 18
Goldsboro 4 5111 332 743 355
Graham 5 0 370 565 109
Grandfather Mt. 0 3109 2 0 0
Granville County 4 1421 300 661 545
Greensboro 7 31620 2224 1392 933
Halifax 0 465 206 54 62
Hamlet 0 261 226 62 89
Harnett County 0 989 303 379 144
Haywood County 2 1980 238 230 0
Hendersonville 9 3802 392 83 663
Hertford County 2 0 405 93 388
Hickory 0 1 241 137 233
Highlands 0 0 55 92 36
High Point 3 702 907 710 64
Hoke County 0 563 203 0 78
Jacksonville 1 0 48 0 0
King's Mountain 0 910 0 0 0
Kinston 3 1437 550 570 386
Laurinburg 0 171 0 421 494
Leaksville-Spray 1 0 2824 275 312
Lee County 0 4680 0 169 0
Lexington 2 264 410 670 4
Lincolnton 0 0 66 159 24
Louisburg 0 2829 0 405 55
Macon County 3 2577 0 229 17
Madison County 1 53 35 0 13
Marion 2 1895 77 58 0
Martin County 1 2264 12 132 1941
Mayodan-Madison 0 0 414 251 161
Maxton 2 8753 213 93 0
Mebane 0 0 0 162 0
Monroe 5 755 290 65 192
Montgomery Co. 4 103 178 148 80
Morehead City 0 0 0 89 70
New Bern 3 11586 155 1110 1853
Newton 2 0 18 471 284
Northampton Co. 1 0 16 13 50
Orange County 3 22327 0 1269 136
Person County 0 2215 81 447 35
Perquimans Co. 0 746 51 16 90
Pitt County 9 3465 377 591 459
Plymouth 0 0 152 101 155
Polk County 0 8589 271 319 527
Raleigh 11 66305 471 3271 373
Randolph County 6 0 0 616 13
Red Springs 4 154 353 201 235
Reidsville 1 5078 0 323 60
Roanoke 0 190 227 203 215
Roanoke Rapids 0 0 0 66 8


Page 9

Chapter Branches & Auxillaries Surgical Dressings Hospital Garments Knitted Articles Miscellaneous Articles
Robersonville 0 0 0 20 0
Rockingham 0 0 356 413 148
Rocky Mount 1 19515 681 507 778
Roper 0 0 24 23 14
Rowland 5 100 210 510 518
Rutherford Co. 3 290 20 52 17
Salisbury 0 9944 808 641 373
Sampson County 0 982 248 103 186
Sand Hill 0 29509 105 1505 260
Scotland Neck 1 2215 134 156 2
Selma 2 2420 125 90 224
Shelby 2 3057 182 383 264
Smithfield 3 7029 165 23 6
Southport 4 1374 92 14 120
St. Pauls 0 0 0 14 0
Stanley County 2 1735 0 364 0
Surry County 0 6426 1 273 20
Thomasville 1 235 84 131 24
Townsville 1 1745 0 176 0
Transylvania Co. 1 9586 390 207 12
Tyrell County 0 0 32 54 31
Vance County 2 13176 172 734 65
Warrenton 0 9691 48 436 210
Watauga County 0 0 0 52 0
Watha 2 111 29 21 8
Weldon 0 0 12 120 0
Whiteville 3 305 234 26 236
Wilkes County 7 0 210 1292 0
Wilmington 0 6688 220 0 155
Wilson County 0 24621 501 697 242
Winston-Salem 6 102320 3369 2940 2175

        The foregoing reports are purely statistical and do not convey just what has been done until we make a few comparisons. First, the one hundred and thirty-three chapters and two hundred and seventy-one branches and auxiliaries for the one hundred counties have a total membership of 130,156. Thousands of our people who are not members of the Red Cross are putting their hearts into the work, all for the reason that their boys are "over there" among the suffering and dying of the allies and we are all working together in harmony for the one aim--"to make the world safe for democracy." One lady who is very active in organizing and overseeing chapters and branches, in writing of her work put it this way:

        "Could you know the trips made to different points 'through country' often in severe thunderstorms, to instruct and organize and though not strong physically I have visited and personally instructed each of our branches and organized the school auxiliaries, and why? Because having no boy to give I was determined to do my bit some way, and God grant that it may help to win the war!"


        Much knitting has been done for the soldiers, even though it is said that the socks last only 4 minutes "over there." In Beaufort county 2,192 knitted articles have been made, in Forsyth 4,661 and in Guilford 2,905. Both old and young have taken part; the old ladies knitting for their second war and the girls learning with untiring effort at the feet of these instructors of '65. Much of the sewing has been done by these elderly ladies--in one instance in Forsyth county an old lady of ninety years, almost totally blind, cut white strips and


Page 10

made eighteen comfort pillows, and another aged lady has knitted dozens of pairs of socks. Many instances of such patriotism could be mentioned.

        Much efficient work is being done by the colored women of our state for the colored soldiers and for our boys too. In Forsyth county they have their headquarters in their school building. Much knitting has been done and 109 nicely made garments were turned in besides 200 comfort bags for the colored soldiers of Winston-Salem. Both races, old and young, "have come forward quietly and unostentatiously to offer their service in the way that seemed good to them, asking neither praise nor reward save that in sense of duty well-performed."

        Thousands of women of wealth and leisure have become actively engaged in Red Cross work, giving all their time and influence to promote this work. Many others who are so busy in their service for their family that they cannot find time to work, bring glasses of jelly, etc., for the Christmas boxes being sent to the hospitals or bundles of clothes now outgrown, for some shivering child in France to help warm its thin little body. Two merchants from Stanly county gave 50 yards of muslin each for bandages--perhaps for their own sons. Another gift of priceless value was made in Yancey county, one lady giving six pounds of wool to the Red Cross. In this mountain county where much spinning and carding is still done, machinery not replacing the home spinning there, the Red Cross room in the school building is fitted up with three spinning wheels and is open every week for the ladies to spin and card. Another gift of rarity and uniqueness is from Transylvania county, Miss Mary Galloway giving the Red Cross a fine steer which sold for $180.00. Surely our patriotism is aroused by such services as these and we pledge ourselves anew to give and do our utmost, whatever it may be.

        The work of the women's clubs deserves mention. In every case the clubs are doing Red Cross work and have adopted the conservation plan in refreshments, serving only ice water or no refreshments at all. The clubs of Cumberland county deserve especial mention. One club of nine members contributed $300 to the Red Cross.

        Special attention may be called to the reports of Forsyth, Guilford, and Gaston counties. Splendid work has been done in these counties as is shown by the reports. Well organized work has been carried on under able instructors and leaders in every branch of the work. They have given their sons, their services, and their substance and may they feel rewarded!

        This report is by no means a complete record of all the work that the women of North Carolina have done. There has been much noble sacrifice and service that shall never come to our ears. The reports here listed are what was obtained from the college representative in each county, and those counties having no report, it has not been received as yet from their representative and we hope to be able to add to them soon. This work will be continued and when the next


Page 11

report is made may every county have her service flag well-filled with stars.

        "Could a service flag be made to represent all those mothers who have so willingly given their sons to the cause of Liberty it would have thousands of stars. Looking back over the first year of this great war North Carolina can be justly proud of her women and their notable work. Surely they have been 'over the top'."