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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Rosamonde R. Boyd, October 29, 1973. Interview G-0011. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Women expect to teach after college graduation

She and her fellow female students at Randolph-Macon expected to go into teaching after graduation, Boyd remembers.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Rosamonde R. Boyd, October 29, 1973. Interview G-0011. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

CONSTANCE MYERS:
I wonder if at Randolph-Macon, you and the other students were inspired to go out into professional life or were you coached to seek marriage and then community service as a wife?
ROSAMONDE R. BOYD:
At the time that I was at Randolph-Macon, I wasn't aware that women had much opportunity in anything but teaching. Evidently, Randolph-Macon did not motivate or stimulate in a broad sense. Practically everybody that I knew was going to teach until they married. That was their plan. Of course, I married at the end of my second year. After all, I didn't just hear speakers from 1918 to '20. Then, when I went to the University of South Carolina, in 1931, this was a different era. Naturally at that time we tried to push women educationally and economically and politically.